Pastides to help oversee spending of Penn St. fine

ashain@thestate.comSeptember 18, 2012 

University of South Carolina president Harris Pastides gives a speech during a graduation ceremony at the Colonial Life Arena.

C. ALUKA BERRY — caberry@thestate.com Buy Photo

USC President Harris Pastides was appointed Tuesday to a NCAA task force to set guidelines for an endowment aiding child-abuse victims funded by Penn State’s $60 million fine in the Jerry Sandusky case.

The 10-member task force also will choose someone to manage the endowment who will select which groups receive grants, the NCAA said.

Penn State will pay $12 million over each of the next five years as a fine in the school's handling of child-abuse allegations against Sandusky, a retired assistant football coach convicted of abusing 10 boys over 15 years. Endowment proceeds cannot be used at Penn State, which is not allowed to cut or eliminate sports to pay the fine.

Pastides is joined by two other college bosses: Rita Hartung Cheng, chancellor of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and Tim White, chancellor of University of California-Riverside.

A pair of Penn State officials also are on the task force: Nan Crouter, dean of the college of health and human development, and Craig Hillemeier, vice dean for clinical affairs at the school’s college of medicine.

Other members include: Brian Gallagher, chief executive of United Way Worldwide; Jane Lowe, a team director at The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; Bryan Samuels, a commissioner at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Pamela Shifman, a director at the NoVo Foundation; and Raymond Torres, executive director of Casey Family Services.

The NCAA acted swiftly following a Penn State-sanctioned report by former FBI Director Louis Freeh that accused coach Joe Paterno and three top officials of hiding child sexual abuse allegations against Sandusky to protect the school and its powerful football program.

In addition to the fine, Penn State was hit with a four-year postseason ban, a reduction in football scholarships and five years of probation. The school also had to vacate victories from 1998 to 2011, which meant Paterno lost the title as major college football's winningest coach.

The Associated Press contributed

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