FINAL: USC 27, CLEMSON 17

5 reasons USC vs. CLEMSON is huge

November 24, 2012 

South Carolina Gamecocks tight end Justice Cunningham (87) leaps over Clemson Tigers safety Rashard Hall (31) for a first down after a catch in the first quarter of their game at Memorial Stadium in Clemson, SC.

GERRY MELENDEZ — gmelendez@thestate.com Buy Photo

When South Carolina plays Clemson in football, it’s always a big game for fans across the state. But the 104th straight meeting between the two schools tonight at 7 p.m. on ESPN is the biggest one yet. Here are five reasons why.

1. MOST WINS

The 19 combined wins between USC (9-2) and Clemson (10-1) entering the game are the most in the rivalry’s history, topping the old mark of 18 set last season.

2. ANNUAL EVENT

It’s the second-longest current uninterrupted rivalry in the nation, with this meeting being the 104th straight game. The two have played every season since 1909 – behind only Minnesota and Wisconsin, which have met 106 years in a row.

3. POWERFUL PROGRAMS

The Gamecocks and Tigers are two of only eight teams in the nation that have been listed in the Top 20 of every Bowl Championship Series poll for the past two years.

4. COACHING CLASH

The two head coaches have combined for an impressive 103-57 record – a winning percentage of .644 – at their respective schools, with USC’s Steve Spurrier at 64-37 in eight seasons and Clemson’s Dabo Swinney at 39-20 in five seasons. Spurrier can become USC’s winningest coach with a victory.

5. FAMILY AFFAIR

Households across the state are divided by the rivalry, but one family will actually play it out on the field this year with a pair of cousins – USC wide receiver Bruce Ellington and Clemson tailback Andre Ellington – going against each other. Bruce leads the Gamecocks with 31 catches for 492 yards, while Andre leads the Tigers in rushing with 959 yards.

Neil White

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