COLLEGE FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME

Frazier, Wuerffel lead new college football HOF class

From Staff and Wire ReportsMay 7, 2013 

Hall of Fame Football

Former Nebraska quarterback Tommie Frazier led the Huskers to two national titles.

CLIFF SCHIAPPA — AP

— The only time Tommie Frazier and Danny Wuerffel shared the field during their brilliant college careers, Frazier’s Nebraska team trampled Wuerffel and Florida in the 1996 Fiesta Bowl to win the national championship.

Wuerffel and the Gators bounced back from that record-breaking 62-24 smackdown to take the title the next season.

The former quarterbacks will cross paths again in December, when they are inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

Wuerffel and Frazier, along with Heisman Trophy winner Ron Dayne, highlighted the latest Hall of Fame class of 12 players and two coaches announced by the National Football Foundation on Tuesday.

The rest of the players to be inducted in Manhattan are: Miami Heisman winner Vinny Testaverde, whose selection was announced Monday; Ted Brown of N.C. State; Tedy Bruschi of Arizona; Jerry Gray of Texas; Steve Meilinger of Kentucky; Orlando Pace of Ohio State; Rod Shoate of Oklahoma; Percy Snow of Michigan State; and Don Trull of Baylor.

The new Hall of Fame coaches are Wayne Hardin, who led Navy and Temple, and Bill McCartney of Colorado.

Former South Carolina star receiver Sterling Sharpe and former Gamecocks coach Jim Carlen also were on the ballot but were not selected.

Florida and Nebraska fans have been eagerly awaiting the inductions of their beloved All-Americans for years.

Wuerffel won the Heisman in 1996, when he led the Gators to the national championship, throwing for 3,625 yards and 39 touchdowns in coach Steve Spurrier’s Fun-n-Gun offense.

“I’m thankful for what college football has meant in my life … and how it allowed me to help other people,” Wuerffel said.

Frazier was the centerpiece of Nebraska’s last great dynasty. The Huskers were 33-3 in games he started and won back-to-back national titles in 1994 and ’95.

“I think it’s been a longer time coming than most of us would have thought,” said former teammate Aaron Graham, a center on those great Nebraska teams. “The guy was the best college football player of our era and certainly deserving of one of the highest honors you can achieve as a college football player.”

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