That time-honored Coca-Cola recipe may or may not be ‘the real thing’

The Associated PressAugust 26, 2013 

Secret Recipes

In this Friday, Aug. 9, 2013 photo, a tour group enters the vault exhibit containing the “secret recipe” for Coca-Cola at the World of Coca-Cola museum, in Atlanta. The 127-year-old recipe for Coke sits inside an imposing steel vault that’s bathed in red security lights, while security cameras monitor the area to make sure the fizzy formula stays a secret. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

DAVID GOLDMAN — associated press

— Coca-Cola keeps the recipe for its 127-year-old soda inside an imposing steel vault that’s bathed in red security lights. Several cameras monitor the area to make sure the fizzy formula stays a secret.

But in one of the many signs that the surveillance is as much about theater as reality, the images that pop up on video screens are of smiling tourists waving at themselves.

“It’s a little bit for show,” concedes a guard at the World of Coca-Cola museum in downtown Atlanta, where the vault is revealed at the end of an exhibit in a puff of smoke.

The ability to push a quaint narrative about a product’s origins and fuel a sense of nostalgia can help drive billions of dollars in sales. That’s invaluable at a time when food makers face greater competition from smaller players and cheaper supermarket store brands.

It’s why companies such as Coca-Cola, Twinkies’ owner Hostess and Kentucky Fried Chicken play up the notion that their recipes are sacred, unchanging documents that need to be closely guarded. The scripts stay the same, although for all we know, the recipes might not.

John Ruff, who formerly headed research & development at Kraft Foods, said companies often recalibrate ingredients for various reasons, including new regulations, fluctuations in commodity costs and other issues that impact mass food production.

“It’s almost this mythological thing, the secret formula,” said the president of the Institute of Food Technologists, which studies the science of food. “I would be amazed if formulas (for big brands) haven’t changed.”

This summer, the Twinkies cream-filled cakes many Americans grew up snacking on made a comeback after being off shelves for about nine months following the bankruptcy of Hostess Brands. At the time, the new owners promised the spongy yellow cakes would taste just like people remember.

A representative for Hostess, Hannah Arnold, said in an email that Twinkies today are “remarkably close to the original recipe,” noting that the first three ingredients are still enriched flour, water and sugar.

Yet a box of Twinkies now lists more than 25 ingredients and has a shelf-life of 45 days, almost three weeks longer than the 26 days from just a year ago. That suggests the ingredients have been tinkered with, to say the least, since they were created in 1930.

For its part, KFC says it still strictly follows the recipe created in 1940 by its famously bearded founder, Colonel Harland Sanders.

Coca-Cola and PepsiCo, the nation’s No. 1 and 2 soda makers, respectively, also are known for touting the roots of their recipes.

In the book “Secret Formula,” which was published in 1994 and drew from interviews with former executives and access to Coca-Cola’s corporate archives, reporter Frederick Allen noted that multiple changes were made to the formula over the years. For instance, Allen noted that that the soda once contained trace amounts of cocaine as a result of the coca leaves in the ingredients, as well as four times the current amount of caffeine.

In an emailed statement, Coca-Cola said its secret formula has remained the same since it was invented in 1886 and that cocaine has “never been an added ingredient” in its soda.

Coke and Pepsi both have changed the source of their caramel coloring and switched from sugar to the cheaper high-fructose corn syrup – but both companies say those changes don’t alter their basic recipes or flavors.

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