Charleston School of Law receives no other offers

The Associated PressOctober 2, 2013 

— The directors of the Charleston School of Law announced Wednesday that since they have received no other offers to buy the institution, they are going ahead with plans to sell the nine-year-old school to The InfiLaw System.

The private school, one of two law schools in South Carolina, had earlier signed a management deal with InfiLaw that operates three for-profit law schools. But that agreement caused concern among Charleston School of Law students, alumni and some state lawmakers worried a sale would diminish the value of the institution’s degrees.

One state lawmaker proposed that, as an alternative, the College of Charleston consider acquiring the law school. The law school directors said in August they were willing to consider other offers through Oct. 1.

“No one submitted an application wanting to buy the law school,” said the statement from Charleston School of Law directors Robert Carr and George Kosko.

“While some people and groups have proposed vague alternative proposals, no one has come forward saying, ‘We want to buy the law school and here are our plans to run it.’ InfiLaw has signed a contract to buy the law school and we will now be moving ahead to close the transaction,” the statement said.

The Charleston School of Law has about 600 students and tuition for the current school year is about $38,000.

The state’s other law school is the University of South Carolina School of Law in Columbia.

InfiLaw operates the Charlotte School of Law, the Florida Coastal School of Law and the Phoenix School of Law.

We are aware that there has been concern in the community about whether this transaction is in the best interests of the law school and the community,” the statement said. “In our view, this is the best and only viable option to secure the future of Charleston School of Law for generations to come.”

The statement said InfiLaw can bring in resources the Charleston School of Law doesn’t have and graduates students who are immediately ready to practice law.

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