Winthrop Poll

Winthrop Poll: S.C. residents more downbeat about economy, their finances

jself@thestate.comOctober 30, 2013 

PATTERSON CLARK — MCT

— South Carolinians have grown more pessimistic about the economy and their personal financial situations, according to a Winthrop Poll released Wednesday.

The percentage of S.C. residents who see the economy as worsening grew in the last eight months, as did the percentage who see their financial situations as poor or getting worse.

The poll interviewed 887 adults living in South Carolina from Oct. 19 to 27.

South Carolinians mostly say the U.S. economy is doing poorly, their outlook worsening from the last Winthrop Poll in February. Roughly half of S.C. residents think the state economy is fairly good, but not great, while roughly one in three say it’s fairly bad. One in 10 say it is very bad.

S.C. residents also are more optimistic about the state’s economic conditions than the country’s, but fewer think conditions in South Carolina are improving than in February.

While the economy, budget and jobs topped the list of most important issues facing the nation and state, according to those surveyed by Winthrop earlier this year, economic issues trailed politicians and government as dire issues in the October poll.

That could be because politicians and government were top of mind for South Carolinians when the latest poll started surveying South Carolinians – only a few days after the end of a 16-day partial federal government shutdown.

Here’s a look at what S.C. residents had to say about their outlook on the economy and their pocketbooks, compared to responses from February’s Winthrop Poll.

Q: What do you think is the most important problem facing the United States today?

17% – Politicians and government

15% – Economy and the economic-financial crisis

11% – Budget deficit or debt

6% – Jobs and unemployment

Q: What do you think is the most important problem facing the state of South Carolina today?

20% – Jobs and unemployment

15% – Education

10.9% – Politicians and government

10.5% – Economy and economic-financial crisis

Q: How would you rate the condition of the national economy these days?

October – 28 percent said very good or fairly good; 70 percent fairly bad or very bad

February – 33 percent said very good or fairly good; 64 percent said fairly bad or very bad

Q: How would you rate the condition of the economy of South Carolina these days?

October – 48 percent very good or fairly good; 47 percent said fairly bad or very bad

February – 51 percent said very good or fairly good; 45 percent said fairly bad or very bad

Q: Right now, do you think that economic conditions in the country as a whole are getting better or getting worse?

October – 35 percent said getting better, 58 percent said getting worse

February – 48 percent said getting better, 44 percent said getting worse

Q: Right now, do you think that economic conditions in South Carolina are getting better or getting worse?

October – 47 percent said getting better, 38 percent said getting worse

February – 52 percent said getting better, 33 percent said getting worse

Q: How would you rate your financial situation today?

October – 46 percent said excellent or good; 54 percent said fair or poor

February – 50 percent said excellent or good; 48 percent fair or poor

Q: Right now, do you think that your financial situation as a whole is getting better or getting worse?

October – 50 percent said getting better, 37 percent said getting worse

February – 52 percent said getting better, 32 percent said getting worse

Reach Self at (803) 771-8658

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