US police agencies buckle down on cops who don’t buckle up

The Associated PressDecember 11, 2013 

US Police Seat Belts

Los Angeles police officers Adrian Garcia, right, and his partner Christopher Ballerini buckle their seat belts as they prepare to leave the LAPD's Pacific division for patrol in Los Angeles Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2013. While 86 percent of Americans now wear seat belts, an upcoming study that will be published by California's Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training estimates that roughly half of law enforcement officers don't wear them. With traffic-related fatalities the leading cause of death of officers on duty, departments nationwide are buckling down to get officers to buckle up. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

NICK UT — The Associated press

— If you’ve ever been pulled over by a police officer for not wearing a seat belt, there’s a decent chance the officer also wasn’t buckled up either.

While 86 percent of Americans now wear seat belts, an upcoming study that will be published by California’s Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training estimates that roughly half of law enforcement officers don’t wear them.

With traffic-related fatalities the leading cause of death of officers on duty, departments nationwide are buckling down to get officers to buckle up.

“Something that can save a person’s life should be on a high priority of being enforced,” said Richard Ashton, a former police chief who has studied officer safety for more than a decade with the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

The Los Angeles Police Department has a new seatbelt education effort after Inspector General Alex Bustamante found that up to 37 percent of officers involved in accidents in 2012 weren’t wearing seatbelts.

State laws mandating seatbelt use often exclude police, but the LAPD and most other departments require them in all but certain circumstances.

The costs of not doing so are clear.

In 14 of the last 15 years, it wasn’t a shooting, but a traffic incident. that was the leading cause of officer deaths, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Of the 733 law enforcement officers killed in a vehicle accident from 1980 through 2008, approximately 42 percent weren’t wearing seatbelts.

“This is such low-hanging fruit. This fruit is on the ground almost,” said Steve Soboroff, president of the Police Commission at a recent meeting of the civilian oversight board.

New recruits grew up wearing seatbelts, but often don’t on the force because senior officers don’t use them.

Some cut old ones off cars and buckle them in to disable the alarm, belt them out of the way, or cut them out entirely.

Part of the problem is blamed on what experts call the myth of a “ninja assassin,” an assailant whose lightning-fast ambush attack would leave officers vulnerable because their seat belts would interfere with their ability to get their gun.

But it’s a myth. “No one can tell you an actual story about it (and) I haven’t been able to document it at all,” Ashton said.

LAPD is using the 25th anniversary of a tragedy to highlight the problem.

On Dec. 12, 1988, three officers died after being thrown from the two LAPD cruisers they were in that collided at a Skid Row intersection.

One officer left behind a pregnant fiancee; another left a pregnant widow.

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