Worried retailers offering deals

Los Angeles TimesDecember 13, 2013 

US NEWS BLACKFRIDAY 8 LA

Shoppers wait in line to purchase discounted shoes at Macys women's department at South Coast Plaza in Costa Mesa, Calif., on Black Friday morning, Nov. 29, 2013. (Don Bartletti/Los Angeles Times/MCT)

FILE PHOTOTGRAPH — MCT

With holiday spending on clothes and toys off to a chilly start, worried retailers are plying shoppers with an early gift: Black Friday-style bargains extended into the first weeks of December.

Merchants get nervous each year during the dreaded early December shopping lull, when consumers rest their wallets before swarming back into malls at the last minute – if they return at all. But this time, shoppers are splurge-shy, there’s a dearth of hot new fashion trends, and the key Thanksgiving weekend failed to deliver hoped-for sales.

“This is the last thing you want to be dealing with, the lack of forward momentum,” said Columbia Business School professor Mark Cohen. “The panic is on.”

That was underscored this week by the Commerce Department’s report on November retail sales, which rose 0.7 percent from October. The increase beat forecasts, mostly because analysts “were bracing for modest disappointment, which lowered the bar of expectations,” said Sterne Agee Chief Economist Lindsey Piegza.

While the gauge was bolstered by strong gains in big-ticket items such as cars and home improvement goods, sales in the categories normally popular for Christmas gifts – apparel, sporting goods and general merchandise – fell or were flat.

Earlier this week, Long Beach, Calif., animal trainer Clarissa Black, 31, ambled through Los Angeles’ Westfield Century City mall with her friend Laura Ramos of Santa Monica, Calif. Their hands were full of Macy’s, Banana Republic and Express bags – but half of the items inside were earlier purchases meant to be returned.

As scattered shoppers strolled under holiday decorations and past signs advertising 60 percent off at H&M and 50 percent off at Gap, the friends said they also spent $200 on cologne and clothing deals. But on the day after Thanksgiving, Black shopped but didn’t spend.

The average consumer spent nearly 4 percent less during the shopping blowout weekend than last year. On top of that, the period between Thanksgiving and Christmas is the shortest it’s been in a decade.

In recent months, retail sales “can euphemistically be described as lackluster,” said Columbia’s Cohen.

He and other analysts interpreted November’s 0.7 percent upswing – the largest increase in five months – as a promising sign economically, in line with gains in the stock market, a reprieve from high pump prices and improving home values.

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