Is that a BMW flying down the bobsled course?

The New York TimesJanuary 3, 2014 

Bobsled World Cup Women

United States' Elana Meyers with brakeman Lauryn Williams compete in the women's bobsled World Cup event on Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013, in Lake Placid, N.Y.

MIKE GROLL — ASSOCIATED PRESS

The last time the U.S. men’s team won an Olympic gold medal in the two-man bobsled competition was 1936, when Franklin D. Roosevelt was in the White House and a gallon of gas cost 10 cents.

Now BMW of North America, which has built six two-person bobsleds for the U.S. men’s and women’s teams competing in Russia this year, is hoping to help change that.

Since 2011, the automaker – which has an automotive plant in Greer – has been working with the U.S. Bobsled and Skeleton Federation to develop a prototype.

The effort has been led by Michael Scully, a creative director at DesignworksUSA, a consultancy owned by the BMW Group that along with designing vehicles for the automaker is hired for projects by nonautomotive companies, including John Deere, Microsoft and Coca-Cola.

On Sunday, a documentary about the project, “Driving on Ice,” will air on NBC. It features Scully and athletes including Steven Holcomb, who won a gold medal in the four-man bobsled event in 2010, and Elana Meyers, who won a bronze in the two-woman bobsled in 2010. (The four-man bobsled continues to be made by the Bo-Dyn Bobsled Project.)

While BMW produced the documentary and is paying for it to air as part of a larger advertising contract with the network, it has the narrative arc and tone of an independent documentary, not a commercial.

The documentary shows how Scully, who in the past has designed racecars, adapts his expertise to bobsleds, which present aerodynamic challenges including being sideways in turns.

Introduced during the commercial breaks for the documentary will be two new Olympic-themed spots for the brand, with one featuring video of the bobsled being developed and no BMW vehicles, and the other taking a more traditional approach, with the automaker’s cars and SUVs driving along snowy roads to transport athletes to training sessions.

Television and digital advertising for the campaign, as well as social media strategy, is by Kirshenbaum Bond Senecal & Partners in New York, part of MDC. Production of the documentary is by UM Studios, the content arm of Universal McCann, which is part of the Interpublic Group of Cos.

BMW North America - which declined to reveal what it spent on the six-year Olympic sponsorship through 2016, the bobsleds or the documentary, or its projected advertising expenditures for the campaign - spent $75.9 million on advertising in the first nine months of 2013 and $159.7 million for the full year of 2012, according to the Kantar Media unit of WPP.

For the first 11 months of 2013, BMW sold 244,061 cars, an increase of 11 percent over the same period in 2012, according to Automotive News. It ranks second behind Mercedes-Benz among luxury vehicles.

BMW is a progenitor of what has come to be known as branded content. Its BMW Films, introduced in 2001 mostly for online viewing, featured stars like Clive Owen in short films driving BMWs, but with no sales pitches.

Trudy Hardy, the vice president of marketing for BMW of North America, said the company was involved with the Olympics in a more tangible way than simply having permission to use its logo.

“The way we entered this sponsored relationship is much deeper than the rights to the rings,” she said. “We wanted to find ways to make our athletes’ performance better.”

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