The Senate’s unemployment deal won’t fly, Boehner says

The Associated PressMarch 14, 2014 

Boehner

House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio calls Obamacare a monstrosity that was a factor in the Republicans winning a special congressional election in Florida this week, Thursday, March 13, 2014, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington.

J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE — AP

— House Speaker John Boehner said Friday he thinks a bipartisan Senate deal to renew expired benefits for the long-term unemployed isn’t feasible, a remark that suggested the agreement is in trouble in the Republican-run House.

Asked Friday by The Associated Press what he thought of the Senate compromise, he said, “You mean the one that can’t be implemented?”

Asked if his comment meant he didn’t like the measure or that he wouldn’t bring it to the House floor for debate, Boehner, R-Ohio, said, “I didn’t say that.”

He gave no details about what the problem might be.

An aide to the speaker later said that Boehner believes making the jobless benefits retroactive to when that program expired in late December, which the Senate deal would do, isn’t workable.

Boehner also is unhappy that the Senate proposal lacks provisions creating jobs, the aide said, a condition Boehner has said must be part of any plan extending the benefits.

The aide spoke on condition of anonymity because he wasn’t authorized to publicly discuss Boehner’s comments.

On Thursday, senators from both parties said they had reached a roughly $10 billion compromise that would renew emergency jobless benefits that ended Dec. 28 and would be paid for by raising revenue. Coverage would be retroactive to Dec. 28 and would last for five months, meaning it would run through May.

The emergency benefits are for people who have exhausted their regular state unemployment coverage, which generally lasts 26 weeks.

So far, just over 2 million people out of work for at least half a year are not getting emergency benefits because the program expired.

When the emergency program expired in late December, it fed a campaign-season competition over which party was best creating jobs and helping families still struggling to right themselves after the Great Recession of 2007-2009.

Democrats, backed by President Barack Obama, said opposition by most Republicans to extending the emergency benefits underscored GOP indifference to financially stressed Americans, while Republicans said they wanted an extension to be paid for and to improve federal job programs.

In December, Boehner said Republicans would consider extending emergency benefits “as long as it’s paid for and as long as there are other efforts that will help get our economy moving once again.”

The State is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Commenting FAQs | Terms of Service