Arts briefs: Digital painting now part of CMA collection

April 6, 2014 

Chef Vivian Howard, the subject of SCETV's 'A Chef's Life.' The program won a Peabody Award for best in electronic media for 2013 and is nominated for James Beard Award for Outstanding Television Program on Location

PBS

ETV is sharing the accolades for its Peabody award for “A Chef's Life,” a look at how a North Carolina chef changes gears as she opens a farm-to-table restaurant.

The 13-part series, produced in conjunction with Markay Media, follows Kingston, N.C., chef Vivian Howard as she explores the origins of Southern cuisine while building a fine dining restaurant. Each episode focuses on a single ingredient, and viewers see how the food is featured in the restaurant she runs with her husband, Ben Knight.

The show was shown on PBS; a new season debuts this fall.

The Peabody Awards, one of the highest honors in broadcasting, will be presented May 19 in New York City.


Something big has come to the Columbia Museum of Art.

“Tatara Fire,” by New York based artist Henry Mandell, is the museum’s first digital painting.

The wall-size painting is a gift from the Contemporaries, the young professionals membership affiliate group.

The work is a reflection of the city’s history. Mandell was inspired by one of the seminal events in Columbia’s history — its burning toward the end of the Civil War in February 1865.

He took about 10,000 hand-traced words related to the history of the city, and then manipulated and painted them digitally through a fine arts software program. The artwork then is painted by a giant ultraviolet inkjet printer.

“It is a deep honor to receive this commission and be a part of the wonderful collection of the Columbia Museum of Art," Mandell said in a news release. “As a part of my series that looks at the theme of transformation through fire, this painting reflects the history of Columbia nearly 150 years ago when the city was burned and changed forever.”

See “Tatara Fire” in the museum’s second-floor atrium.

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