Minnie Calhoun returned to Lone Star in 1972, leaving behind a New Jersey teaching career. Her father helped build the railroad line in the 19th century; she lives where the train once stopped and remembers when Lone Star Road was ‘full of people’ who delivered cotton, picked up mail, and paid a dime to ride to Sumter.
Minnie Calhoun returned to Lone Star in 1972, leaving behind a New Jersey teaching career. Her father helped build the railroad line in the 19th century; she lives where the train once stopped and remembers when Lone Star Road was ‘full of people’ who delivered cotton, picked up mail, and paid a dime to ride to Sumter. Photo by Gerry Melendez
Minnie Calhoun returned to Lone Star in 1972, leaving behind a New Jersey teaching career. Her father helped build the railroad line in the 19th century; she lives where the train once stopped and remembers when Lone Star Road was ‘full of people’ who delivered cotton, picked up mail, and paid a dime to ride to Sumter. Photo by Gerry Melendez

Chapter 16 | 'Worry about the people'

May 17, 2007 03:27 PM

UPDATED May 18, 2007 11:25 AM

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