Roger Pinckney XI of Daufuskie Island, an author known for his belief in the spiritual tradition of voodoo, shows a home along Haig Point Road with its trim painted ‘haint’ blue. It’s a longtime Gullah tradition, Pinckney noted, to keep evil or ghosts out. ‘Ghosts,’ Pinckney says, ‘don't like blue.’
Roger Pinckney XI of Daufuskie Island, an author known for his belief in the spiritual tradition of voodoo, shows a home along Haig Point Road with its trim painted ‘haint’ blue. It’s a longtime Gullah tradition, Pinckney noted, to keep evil or ghosts out. ‘Ghosts,’ Pinckney says, ‘don't like blue.’ Josh Mitelman Josh Mitelman/The Island Packet
Roger Pinckney XI of Daufuskie Island, an author known for his belief in the spiritual tradition of voodoo, shows a home along Haig Point Road with its trim painted ‘haint’ blue. It’s a longtime Gullah tradition, Pinckney noted, to keep evil or ghosts out. ‘Ghosts,’ Pinckney says, ‘don't like blue.’ Josh Mitelman Josh Mitelman/The Island Packet

Voodoo’s heyday has passed, but the Gullah tradition still bewitches in SC

January 27, 2016 01:04 PM