More Videos

Richland school resource officers learn how to work with students with disabilities 1:05

Richland school resource officers learn how to work with students with disabilities

The dramatic final minutes that ended Lexington deputy's career 2:50

The dramatic final minutes that ended Lexington deputy's career

6 tips for keeping roof rats away 0:53

6 tips for keeping roof rats away

Chicken processing plant odd fit for growing upscale riverfront development 1:46

Chicken processing plant odd fit for growing upscale riverfront development

Hemp or pot: What's the difference? 1:44

Hemp or pot: What's the difference?

The case that haunts you: Dail Dinwiddie's disappearance 1:52

The case that haunts you: Dail Dinwiddie's disappearance

New Santee Cooper interim CEO Jim Brogdon discusses possible sale of the utility 1:10

New Santee Cooper interim CEO Jim Brogdon discusses possible sale of the utility

Frank Martin says there are different ways to be a leader. Who will step forward? 1:23

Frank Martin says there are different ways to be a leader. Who will step forward?

South Carolina football: Taking stock of remaining schedule 5:24

South Carolina football: Taking stock of remaining schedule

Josh Kendall: The good news, bad news from USC's 3-1 start 2:15

Josh Kendall: The good news, bad news from USC's 3-1 start

  • Waccamaw River rising rapidly, blocking roads

    Following Hurricane Matthew, the Waccamaw River is expected to crest at 17 feet on Oct. 17, according to National Weather Service. The record crest is 17.8 feet. Floods from the Waccamaw River keep some riverside residents from getting in and out of their homes.

Following Hurricane Matthew, the Waccamaw River is expected to crest at 17 feet on Oct. 17, according to National Weather Service. The record crest is 17.8 feet. Floods from the Waccamaw River keep some riverside residents from getting in and out of their homes. Aria Hangyu Chen ahchen@mcclatchy.com / Twitter: @aria_chy
Following Hurricane Matthew, the Waccamaw River is expected to crest at 17 feet on Oct. 17, according to National Weather Service. The record crest is 17.8 feet. Floods from the Waccamaw River keep some riverside residents from getting in and out of their homes. Aria Hangyu Chen ahchen@mcclatchy.com / Twitter: @aria_chy

Storm recovery focus directed to river near Grand Strand

October 13, 2016 9:35 PM

More Videos

Richland school resource officers learn how to work with students with disabilities 1:05

Richland school resource officers learn how to work with students with disabilities

The dramatic final minutes that ended Lexington deputy's career 2:50

The dramatic final minutes that ended Lexington deputy's career

6 tips for keeping roof rats away 0:53

6 tips for keeping roof rats away

Chicken processing plant odd fit for growing upscale riverfront development 1:46

Chicken processing plant odd fit for growing upscale riverfront development

Hemp or pot: What's the difference? 1:44

Hemp or pot: What's the difference?

The case that haunts you: Dail Dinwiddie's disappearance 1:52

The case that haunts you: Dail Dinwiddie's disappearance

New Santee Cooper interim CEO Jim Brogdon discusses possible sale of the utility 1:10

New Santee Cooper interim CEO Jim Brogdon discusses possible sale of the utility

Frank Martin says there are different ways to be a leader. Who will step forward? 1:23

Frank Martin says there are different ways to be a leader. Who will step forward?

South Carolina football: Taking stock of remaining schedule 5:24

South Carolina football: Taking stock of remaining schedule

Josh Kendall: The good news, bad news from USC's 3-1 start 2:15

Josh Kendall: The good news, bad news from USC's 3-1 start

  • The dramatic final minutes that ended Lexington deputy's career

    Lexington Co. Master Deputy Eddie Richardson volunteered for a call that injured him and ended his career.