Brian DeQuincey Newman, center, and his attorney Bakari Sellers leave court Tuesday after Newman pleaded guilty to failing to pay state taxes.
Brian DeQuincey Newman, center, and his attorney Bakari Sellers leave court Tuesday after Newman pleaded guilty to failing to pay state taxes. Tracy Glantz FILE PHOTOGRAPH
Brian DeQuincey Newman, center, and his attorney Bakari Sellers leave court Tuesday after Newman pleaded guilty to failing to pay state taxes. Tracy Glantz FILE PHOTOGRAPH

Newman’s ‘mentor-protege’ program paid $38,000 to train him for penny contract work

January 08, 2016 04:34 PM

UPDATED January 08, 2016 09:52 PM

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  • How a Historically Black College changed Benedict's new president's life

    For Benedict College's new president, Roslyn Artis, her first experience with a Historically Black College left a lasting memory