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New Santee Cooper interim CEO Jim Brogdon discusses possible sale of the utility 1:10

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The dramatic final minutes that ended Lexington deputy's career 2:50

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Clemson coach Dabo Swinney previews matchup with Syracuse 7:43

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South Carolina football: Taking stock of remaining schedule 5:24

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President Trump stops motorcade to greet supporters 10:18

President Trump stops motorcade to greet supporters

Josh Kendall: The good news, bad news from USC's 3-1 start 2:15

Josh Kendall: The good news, bad news from USC's 3-1 start

Chris Silva talks Final Four, upcoming season 3:07

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    The Richland County Sheriff's Department on Oct. 16, 2017, unveiled a policy that trains deputies to better recognize students with emotional, mental or intellectual disabilities and assess during an incident whether a student poses a threat to their own safety or the safety of those around them.