National Rifle Association President Charlton Heston holds up a rifle as he addresses gun owners during a “get-out-the-vote” rally in Manchester, N.H., in October 2002. Gun interests, wary of any possible limits on weaponry, have successfully lobbied for limitations on government research and funding into the causes of gun violence, and which policies work best against it.
National Rifle Association President Charlton Heston holds up a rifle as he addresses gun owners during a “get-out-the-vote” rally in Manchester, N.H., in October 2002. Gun interests, wary of any possible limits on weaponry, have successfully lobbied for limitations on government research and funding into the causes of gun violence, and which policies work best against it. Jim Cole AP File Photo
National Rifle Association President Charlton Heston holds up a rifle as he addresses gun owners during a “get-out-the-vote” rally in Manchester, N.H., in October 2002. Gun interests, wary of any possible limits on weaponry, have successfully lobbied for limitations on government research and funding into the causes of gun violence, and which policies work best against it. Jim Cole AP File Photo

Why are gun violence researchers becoming an endangered species?

October 11, 2015 09:04 PM