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Santa's elf got pulled over by a deputy. Here's what happened 1:48

Santa's elf got pulled over by a deputy. Here's what happened

Steven Gilmore discusses winning North offensive MVP honors 0:38

Steven Gilmore discusses winning North offensive MVP honors

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Special prosecutor David Pascoe outlines Rick Quinn's plea agreement

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USC’s Patrick Wright explains why sexual harassment often goes unreported

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Dakereon Joyner describes his love of USC and his 3 girlfriends

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Dabo Swinney talks rivalry with Alabama

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  • Lowcountry author Roger Pinckney on his belief in Voodoo

    Beaufort native Roger Pinckney, author of ten books including the highly-acclaimed "Blue Roots," spoke with The Island Packet and The Beaufort Gazette recently about how he became interested in voodoo at an early age, thanks in part to his father, who was Beaufort County coroner.

Beaufort native Roger Pinckney, author of ten books including the highly-acclaimed "Blue Roots," spoke with The Island Packet and The Beaufort Gazette recently about how he became interested in voodoo at an early age, thanks in part to his father, who was Beaufort County coroner. Josh Mitelman jmitelman@islandpacket.com
Beaufort native Roger Pinckney, author of ten books including the highly-acclaimed "Blue Roots," spoke with The Island Packet and The Beaufort Gazette recently about how he became interested in voodoo at an early age, thanks in part to his father, who was Beaufort County coroner. Josh Mitelman jmitelman@islandpacket.com

Broken spell: Voodoo's heyday has long passed, but the Gullah tradition continues to bewitch

January 22, 2016 02:37 PM

UPDATED September 20, 2016 08:59 AM

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Overwhelmingly positive responses to the #MeToo hashtag 1:15

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Dawn Staley gives injury and waiver updates on USC’s guards 1:49

Dawn Staley gives injury and waiver updates on USC’s guards

Santa's elf got pulled over by a deputy. Here's what happened 1:48

Santa's elf got pulled over by a deputy. Here's what happened

Steven Gilmore discusses winning North offensive MVP honors 0:38

Steven Gilmore discusses winning North offensive MVP honors

Special prosecutor David Pascoe outlines Rick Quinn's plea agreement 2:16

Special prosecutor David Pascoe outlines Rick Quinn's plea agreement

USC’s Patrick Wright explains why sexual harassment often goes unreported 1:56

USC’s Patrick Wright explains why sexual harassment often goes unreported

Five questions with D.J. Swearinger 1:30

Five questions with D.J. Swearinger

Dakereon Joyner describes his love of USC and his 3 girlfriends 1:47

Dakereon Joyner describes his love of USC and his 3 girlfriends

Dabo Swinney talks rivalry with Alabama 3:53

Dabo Swinney talks rivalry with Alabama

Catherine Templeton: 'Henry is no Trump!' 2:43

Catherine Templeton: 'Henry is no Trump!'

  • Overwhelmingly positive responses to the #MeToo hashtag

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