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Gamecock target Rick Sandidge gives recruiting update, discusses USC defense

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Dabo Swinney talks rivalry with Alabama

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Dakereon Joyner describes his love of USC and his 3 girlfriends

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Alan Wilson speaks for ratepayers at Public Service Commission

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Watch: Dutch Fork's Bryce Thompson recaps visit to South Carolina

  • Dr. David Tonkin on the side effects of prescribing 'deadly medications'

    Dr. David Tonkin of Elite Pain Management says two-thirds of the ones who overdose on opioids were prescribed them by their doctors. The key to curing the county's heroin and opioid epidemic lies in better training for doctors prescribing these "deadly medications" and giving doctors the time they need with their patients to find other solutions that don't have to come in a pill bottle, he said on Sept. 27, 2016.

Dr. David Tonkin of Elite Pain Management says two-thirds of the ones who overdose on opioids were prescribed them by their doctors. The key to curing the county's heroin and opioid epidemic lies in better training for doctors prescribing these "deadly medications" and giving doctors the time they need with their patients to find other solutions that don't have to come in a pill bottle, he said on Sept. 27, 2016. eweaver@thesunnews.com
Dr. David Tonkin of Elite Pain Management says two-thirds of the ones who overdose on opioids were prescribed them by their doctors. The key to curing the county's heroin and opioid epidemic lies in better training for doctors prescribing these "deadly medications" and giving doctors the time they need with their patients to find other solutions that don't have to come in a pill bottle, he said on Sept. 27, 2016. eweaver@thesunnews.com

Richland and Lexington get high health rankings, but overdoses a concern

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UPDATED March 29, 2017 08:23 AM

More Videos

USC’s Patrick Wright explains why sexual harassment often goes unreported 1:56

USC’s Patrick Wright explains why sexual harassment often goes unreported

A mother's pain lingers after 31 years with no closure 1:58

A mother's pain lingers after 31 years with no closure

Gamecock target Rick Sandidge gives recruiting update, discusses USC defense 1:40

Gamecock target Rick Sandidge gives recruiting update, discusses USC defense

Dabo Swinney talks rivalry with Alabama 3:53

Dabo Swinney talks rivalry with Alabama

Moore not yet conceding in Alabama Senate race 0:45

Moore not yet conceding in Alabama Senate race

Dakereon Joyner describes his love of USC and his 3 girlfriends 1:47

Dakereon Joyner describes his love of USC and his 3 girlfriends

Alan Wilson speaks for ratepayers at Public Service  Commission 1:46

Alan Wilson speaks for ratepayers at Public Service Commission

Chapin High School students give holiday gift for district sports complex 1:32

Chapin High School students give holiday gift for district sports complex

Catherine Templeton: 'Henry is no Trump!' 2:43

Catherine Templeton: 'Henry is no Trump!'

Watch: Dutch Fork's Bryce Thompson recaps visit to South Carolina 1:51

Watch: Dutch Fork's Bryce Thompson recaps visit to South Carolina

  • USC’s Patrick Wright explains why sexual harassment often goes unreported

    USC’s Patrick Wright explains why sexual harassment often goes unreported.