S.C. Sen. John Courson, R-Richland, was suspended from his State House seat in March by Gov. Henry McMaster after he was charged with misconduct in office, related to special prosecutor David Pascoe’s corruption probe.
S.C. Sen. John Courson, R-Richland, was suspended from his State House seat in March by Gov. Henry McMaster after he was charged with misconduct in office, related to special prosecutor David Pascoe’s corruption probe. File photo
S.C. Sen. John Courson, R-Richland, was suspended from his State House seat in March by Gov. Henry McMaster after he was charged with misconduct in office, related to special prosecutor David Pascoe’s corruption probe. File photo
The Buzz

The Buzz

A blog from The State's political team of Jamie Self, Avery Wilks, Maayan Schechter and Bristow Marchant.

Indicted. Guilty. Yet these SC lawmakers still are pulling in taxpayer money

January 02, 2018 07:58 AM

More Videos

  • The history of sexual harassment in America: five things to know

    Just like many movements for equal rights in America, the path for women to seek recourse from sexual harassment has been through the courts. But grassroots activism in the 1970s opened the space for a nationwide conversation, and the Civil Rights Movement can be credited for building a legal foundation that feminist legal theorists expanded upon to fight sexual harassment. Many of the first lawsuits were brought by African American women like Mechelle Vinson, whose case led to the Supreme Court’s landmark 1986 ruling that employers could be liable for the sexual harassers who preyed on women at their workplace. CREDIT: Anson Ling/Timeline