"It's just been bad since the day I planted to be honest with you," Drew Martin says standing on the edge of a soybean field off Nichols Highway on Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2015. He looks out on the drying plants saying it's a total loss. Since the beans were planted in May, Martin said, there was an extreme drought topped off with the recent flood. "They're just rotten. But, the farmer just keeps going and keeps trying again," he said. Martin, 34, has been farming since he graduated from high school in 1999, the same year as Hurricane Floyd.
"It's just been bad since the day I planted to be honest with you," Drew Martin says standing on the edge of a soybean field off Nichols Highway on Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2015. He looks out on the drying plants saying it's a total loss. Since the beans were planted in May, Martin said, there was an extreme drought topped off with the recent flood. "They're just rotten. But, the farmer just keeps going and keeps trying again," he said. Martin, 34, has been farming since he graduated from high school in 1999, the same year as Hurricane Floyd. Janet Blackmon Morgan jblackmon@thesunnews.com
"It's just been bad since the day I planted to be honest with you," Drew Martin says standing on the edge of a soybean field off Nichols Highway on Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2015. He looks out on the drying plants saying it's a total loss. Since the beans were planted in May, Martin said, there was an extreme drought topped off with the recent flood. "They're just rotten. But, the farmer just keeps going and keeps trying again," he said. Martin, 34, has been farming since he graduated from high school in 1999, the same year as Hurricane Floyd. Janet Blackmon Morgan jblackmon@thesunnews.com

For coastal farmers still reeling from drought, flood struck at worst time

October 24, 2015 10:38 PM