Opinion Extra

Opinion Extra

The national death wish

The new Republican position is that if we reduce the number of low-skill immigrants coming into the country, that will reduce the pool of labor, put upward pressure on wages and bring more Americans back into the labor force. It seems like a plausible argument. That is, until you actually get out in the real world.

Opinion Extra

Trump and the ‘Madman Theory’

Donald Trump’s foreign policy is composed of men of experience, judgment and traditionalism. The commander in chief, on the other hand, is quite the opposite: inexperienced, untraditional, unbounded. And thus far, this dichotomy looks, surprisingly, like it might have a chance of working.

Opinion Extra

America’s predictable pension crisis

Some American disasters come as bolts from the blue — the stock market crash of October 1929, Pearl Harbor, the designated hitter, 9/11. Others are predictable because they arise from arithmetic that is neither hidden nor arcane. Now comes the tsunami of pension problems that will wash over many cities and states.

Opinion Extra

Echoes of internment

Seventy-five years ago this week, President Roosevelt signs an executive order, and soon the poster starts appearing on lampposts. The headline reads: “Instructions to All Persons of Japanese Ancestry.” It is an evacuation order.

Opinion Extra

Nikki Haley could teach her boss how to respond to anti-Semitism

President Trump’s unseemly record in refusing to directly address and condemn anti-Semitism leads some to conclude that he is a bigot, while others interpret this as evidence of his narcissism. His decision to call a reporter’s question about the rise in anti-Semitic incidents “very insulting,” as though it was a personal indictment of him, only reinforced the impression that Trump is, at best, clueless.

Opinion Extra

Beltway panic, Wall Street Zen

There are hints of global instability in North Korea’s missile test and various Russian maneuvers and signs of domestic unrest in the spasms of protest since Election Day, and political journalists and Washington hands freak out daily over Donald Trump’s presidency, but the stock market keeps acting like everything is fine, or even just great again.

Opinion Extra

Rx for success: early reading

Businesses can only compete if we have a ready and able workforce, which means South Carolina has a lot of work to do. Reach Out and Read Carolinas is committed to reducing our high rate of adult illiteracy, which starts with increasing access to effective early childhood education.

Opinion Extra

Here’s how you can keep your heart healthy

In 2015, heart disease was once again our leading cause of death in South Carolina. It killed 10,034 of us, and accounted for 50,167 hospitalizations, running up a cost of more than $3.2 billion. This is truly a burden we cannot afford. And it is avoidable.

Opinion Extra

How liberals undermine food stamps

A new report commissioned by the US Agriculture Department found that SNAP households spend 20 percent of their benefits, typically about $255 per month per household, on sweetened beverages (both sodas and non-fizzy drinks), desserts, salty snacks, candy and sugar.

Opinion Extra

How to build paranoia

An Atlantic magazine article by Washington journalist David Frum frets about a coming autocracy engineered by President Donald Trump, and the amazing thing is that the author did not notice the past eight years. It’s as if Noah’s Ark had finally landed, and the understood message was that a flood was only now on its way.

Opinion Extra

Trump’s ‘fine-tuned machine’ is going haywire

President Trump is flailing like a man who fears he’s about to go under, and he hasn’t even been in office a full month. The administration faces two acute, interlocking crises: serious questions about his campaign’s contacts with official and unofficial representatives of the Russian government, and appalling levels of dysfunction in the White House that make self-inflicted wounds the rule rather than the exception.

Opinion Extra

Michael Flynn is gone and everything is fine, just fine, great

News reports suggest that every member of the Trump White House spends hours each day busily talking on background to the press. Also, no one in the administration knows what is going on. Monday afternoon, Kellyanne Conway announced that national security adviser Michael Flynn had the president’s “full confidence.” Then within an hour Sean Spicer announced that the president was “evaluating” what course to pursue. Then by 11 p.m. Flynn had “retired.”

Opinion Extra

Some walls work

While the debate continues about when, how quickly and who will pay for President Donald Trump’s “wall” across America’s Southern border with Mexico, at least one country known for its liberal politics is offering a lesson.

Opinion Extra

Let’s empower SC school districts to keep kids safe

Jacob Hall’s Law would allow authorized school employees to carry a weapon on school grounds. It would give local districts, and therefore parents and taxpayers, the flexibility to arrive at solutions that best fit their communities. The bill does not mandate arming teachers. It does not say that anyone and everyone with a concealed-weapons permit may enter a school with a gun. It does not dictate any specific solution at all. It gives the local district another tool to confront the problem.

Videos

Keenan vs. Gray Collegiate highlights and postgame reaction

Keenan defeated Gray Collegiate, 73-58, in the Class 2A Upper State Final.
lbezjak@thestate.com
Keenan vs. Gray Collegiate highlights and postgame reaction 3:39

Keenan vs. Gray Collegiate highlights and postgame reaction

Keenan celebration after win over Gray Collegiate 0:54

Keenan celebration after win over Gray Collegiate

Gray Collegiate's Jalek Felton with a one-handed slam against Keenan 0:16

Gray Collegiate's Jalek Felton with a one-handed slam against Keenan

USC glad to have Skai Moore back as linebacker group shrinks 1:20

USC glad to have Skai Moore back as linebacker group shrinks