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Key players in the Boeing deal

State Sen. Paul Campbell

Formerly an executive for Alcoa in Washington state, Campbell was called in to assure Boeing executives of the work ethic and abilities of South Carolinians. "Measured in work force hours per ton, this is the most productive work force in the world," Campbell said of S.C. workers. "We have the best work force in the world."

Bob Faith

Faith laid much of the groundwork for last week's decision as one of the leaders of the push to get Boeing's first 787 production line, awarded to Washington in 2003. While that effort was not successful, the state landed two large Boeing 787 subcontractors - Vought and Alenia - giving the company experience in South Carolina. This year, Boeing bought out Vought's North Charleston facility.

U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham

A member of the Senate's Armed Services Committee, which oversees Defense Department purchases of billions from Boeing, Graham was in constant contact with executives of the aircraft maker. He also counseled state lawmakers on their concerns that Boeing might be just playing South Carolina off against Washington to get the best deal.

State Sen. Larry Grooms

Grooms asked Boeing's board members if they seriously were considering Charleston for the second 787 line or using South Carolina as a pawn in the company's fight with its unionized Washington state workers.

Speaker of the House Bobby Harrell

Harrell played a part in the 2003 negotiations with Boeing. Then, with Senate leader Glenn McConnell, he used last week's special legislative session to quickly pass incentives promised the aircraft-maker.

State Sen. Hugh Leatherman

The powerful head of the state Senate's Finance Committee cleared the way for added incentive money and, with Commerce Secretary Joe Taylor, was most widely credited publicly Wednesday with landing Boeing. Some of the praise stunningly came from Gov. Mark Sanford, previously an acidic critic of Leatherman.

President pro tem Glenn McConnell

The head of the state Senate played a part in the 2003 negotiations with Boeing. Then, with Speaker Harrell, McConnell used last week's special legislative session to quickly pass incentives promised the aircraft-maker.

Gov. Mark Sanford

First with Faith and later with Commerce Secretary Joe Taylor, Sanford has been chasing Boeing since 2003. Still, there were concerns that Sanford's ideological opposition to economic-development incentives could nix the deal. Friday, however, he signed legislation that could give Boeing incentives worth $450 million.

Joe Taylor

After Faith departed Commerce, Taylor inherited the Boeing portfolio, flying with Sanford to various air shows across the world to keep up contacts with the airplane-maker's executives. He defends incentives for Boeing, saying, "We're not in the business of picking winners and losers or offering incentives that give one company an advantage over another company. But there is nobody else in the state making airplanes."

Billy Wilkins

Wilkins called up a friend who is an executive at Boeing, asking if the company's interest in South Carolina was genuine. Assured it was, a series of mid-August meetings were held in Charleston with key legislators, moving the dealmaking into high gear.

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