Living

Indian traditions of healing

The traditional use by American Indians of food and plants for healing will be the subject of a presentation at 2 p.m. Sunday at St. Simon St. Jude Episcopal Church, 1110 Kinley Road, Irmo.

Will Goins, chief of the Cherokee Indian Tribe of South Carolina, will discuss the role of natural medicine and the American Indian medical practitioner.

Long before European settlers reached North American, the natives had developed sophisticated medical uses of plants. Information: (803) 699-0446.

'HELP IS HERE' STOPPING IN COLUMBIA

The "Help is Here Express" bus tour visits Columbia Wednesday, stopping at the S.C. HIV/AIDS Council to provide free or inexpensive prescription medication for the uninsured or those struggling financially.

The bus tour is part of a nationwide effort by Partnership for Prescription Assistance, sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. Specialists on the tour help people access hundreds of programs providing free or inexpensive drugs.

Just show up at the HIV/AIDS Council, 1115 Calhoun St., Columbia around 11 a.m. to get help. Information: pparx.org.

HEALING WITH HUMOR AT CANCER ALLIANCE

Presentations on prostate cancer, colorectal cancer and healing with humor will be among the highlights of the S.C. Cancer Alliance's annual meeting Oct. 23.

The meeting runs 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Columbia Conference Center, 169 Laurelhurst Road, Columbia. It costs $25. Information: (866) 745-5680.

MANAGE ONGOING HEALTH PROBLEMS

People with ongoing health problems such as arthritis, diabetes or heart disease can learn how to better manage their conditions in a new six-week program sponsored by the Arthritis Foundation and S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control.

The workshops are part of the Living Well South Carolina program. Participants meet for 2 1/2 hours each week to practice new skills and behaviors.

The free program begins Oct. 7 and meets each Wednesday from 1-3:30 p.m. for six weeks at the Capital Senior Center, 1650 Park Circle, Columbia. Register: (803) 898-0760.

BREAST CANCER, ROLE OF NURSE NAVIGATOR

Dottye Woodogaza of the S.C. Comprehensive Breast Center will speak about early detection of breast cancer and the role of a nurse navigator at the Northeast Columbia Women's Club meeting at 7 p.m. Oct. 5.

The club meets at The Palmetto Activity Center, 105 Summit Centre Circle, across from Summit Parkway Middle School. Free. Information: (803) 348-7421.

HEALTH FAIR AT BETHLEHEM BAPTIST

The Bethlehem Baptist Church will offer community workshops and a health fair 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 10 at 1218 Lyon St., Columbia.

The workshop topics include teen health, self defense for women, diabetes, heart disease, nutrition and caring for the elderly. Diabetes and prostate cancer screening also will be offered.

Information/register for screening: (803) 466-4091.

KIDS AND ASTHMA

Children with asthma often struggle to participate in sports.

An event this month is designed in part to help the youngsters, and their families, deal with their special concerns.

The Healthy Hoops Midlands Challenge features basketball lessons from USC coaches Darrin Horn and Dawn Staley, health screenings and asthma management tips for children ages 7 to 15 and their families.

The event runs from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sept. 26 at Greenview Park, 6700 David St. in Columbia.

MEDICINE DISPOSAL

Got old prescription medicine and don't know what to do with it?

Don't simply toss it in your trash or flush it down a drain, where some drugs can be harmful to the environment. Instead, let the Lexington County Sheriff's Department handle disposal properly for you. You can dispose of the medication at one of their three facilities - 521 Gibson Road in Lexington, 111 Lincreek Drive in Columbia (Irmo area) and 102 Airport Road in Pelion.

Medication that is contained in a needle or syringe will not be accepted.

Either remove labels or use a black marker to blot out personal information on the labels.

BREAKFAST FOR YOUR BRAIN

The Capital Senior Center is offering a new program aimed at enhancing memory function. Breakfast For Your Brain is a six-week class that teaches mental exercises for the 50-plus crowd. The 45-minute classes begin Oct. 1 and will start at 8 a.m. each Thursday. Information: call 779-1971.

BUTTERFLY RELEASE

Hundreds of butterflies will be released Sept. 29 at the State House to honor friends who have been victims of ovarian cancer.

The event, set for 5:30 p.m., is designed to promote awareness of the whispering symptoms of ovarian cancer. The S.C. Ovarian Cancer Foundation's Riverbanks Region Chapter is sponsoring the event.

More than 26,000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year, and more than 16,000 of them will lose their lives. It is one of the deadliest of cancers because its symptoms aren't easily recognized at onset.

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