Religion

Former megachurch pastor returns to SC with Second Chance Church

Changes at NewSpring Church

Moultrie Ball, who's been with NewSpring Church for about four years, shares his thoughts about founding pastor Perry Noble being asked to resign.
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Moultrie Ball, who's been with NewSpring Church for about four years, shares his thoughts about founding pastor Perry Noble being asked to resign.

Ousted NewSpring Church founder Perry Noble launched his new church Sunday. Kind of.

The former megachurch pastor delivered his first sermon for Second Chance Church Sunday. But Noble, who was removed from the church he founded because of alcohol and family issues, didn’t deliver his message from a pulpit or to a crowd of onlookers.

Noble’s sermon was delivered online, posted on his Facebook page. In spite of the lack of a physical connection with his intended audience, Second Chance Church is finding an audience.

Noble posted the video to Facebook after 1 p.m. Four hours later, it had garnered more than 1,600 “Likes” or reactions, 1,200 comments and nearly 500 shares.

“Welcome to the digital launch of Second Chance Church,” Noble said in the post, which included the shareline which was the theme of the sermon, “So I Screwed Up...Now What?”

Noble said his sermon was a “message of hope, a message of peace, a message of assurance and that Jesus Christ is alive and totally in on the lives of second chancers.”

Paperwork for second Chance Church was filed in July with the South Carolina Secretary of State’s office. The new nonprofit is filed with a different address than The Growth Company, which was incorporated by Noble last November and offers consultations and speaking engagements for churches.

NewSpring is the state’s largest church, with more than 30,000 members in 17 cities in South Carolina, including three in the Midlands. NewSpring has 14 campuses in the Palmetto State, but the church has lost membership in the wake of its split with Noble more than a year ago.

NewSpring’s roots go back to a 1998 Bible study group in Noble’s apartment and its first official service was in January 2000. The church had an income of $64 million in 2015, according to an annual report on the church’s website.

Noble has preached at several churches since he was fired on July 1, 2016. Congregation members were told the well-kept secret on July 10, 2016. After his ouster, Noble spent 30 days in an Arizona treatment center.

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