In this 2013, photo provided by Center for Individual Rights, Rebecca Friedrichs, a veteran Orange County, Calif., public school teacher, poses for a portrait. The Supreme Curt will hear arguments in a California case brought by a group of public school teachers who claim such mandatory fees violate the First Amendment rights of workers who disagree with the union's positions. The lead plaintiff in the case is Friedrichs, who says she left the California Teachers Association after becoming disillusioned with its mission. She wants the high court to overturn a 39-year-old ruling that said states can require non-members to pay "fair share" fees to cover what it costs the union to represent them in bargaining as long as the money doesn't go for political purposes.
In this 2013, photo provided by Center for Individual Rights, Rebecca Friedrichs, a veteran Orange County, Calif., public school teacher, poses for a portrait. The Supreme Curt will hear arguments in a California case brought by a group of public school teachers who claim such mandatory fees violate the First Amendment rights of workers who disagree with the union's positions. The lead plaintiff in the case is Friedrichs, who says she left the California Teachers Association after becoming disillusioned with its mission. She wants the high court to overturn a 39-year-old ruling that said states can require non-members to pay "fair share" fees to cover what it costs the union to represent them in bargaining as long as the money doesn't go for political purposes. Greg Schneider AP
In this 2013, photo provided by Center for Individual Rights, Rebecca Friedrichs, a veteran Orange County, Calif., public school teacher, poses for a portrait. The Supreme Curt will hear arguments in a California case brought by a group of public school teachers who claim such mandatory fees violate the First Amendment rights of workers who disagree with the union's positions. The lead plaintiff in the case is Friedrichs, who says she left the California Teachers Association after becoming disillusioned with its mission. She wants the high court to overturn a 39-year-old ruling that said states can require non-members to pay "fair share" fees to cover what it costs the union to represent them in bargaining as long as the money doesn't go for political purposes. Greg Schneider AP

Union fees from 5 million workers targeted at Supreme Court

January 09, 2016 07:48 PM