Local

Dam, dike at Fort Jackson lakes up for repairs

Lower Legion Lake on Fort Jackson after an October 2015 flood smashed Columbia, causing dams and dikes to break, and water to drain out of lakes
Lower Legion Lake on Fort Jackson after an October 2015 flood smashed Columbia, causing dams and dikes to break, and water to drain out of lakes

COLUMBIA, SC Fort Jackson says it has found no environmental problems that would prevent repairing a storm-battered dike and dam at Upper and Lower legion lakes on the sprawling Columbia military training base.

The fort updated its plans for the repair work Thursday now that environmental studies are completed, base officials said. The army issued a document known as A Finding of No Significant Impact on the proposed work.

Thursday’s release means “the proposed repairs will not have a significant environmental effect on the human environment,’’ the fort said in a news release. Further environmental study is not necessary, the fort said. But the public has 30 days to comment on the military’s environmental findings before they become final, according to the base.

Thursday’s announcement is the latest development in the fort’s plans to repair and shore up dams that were hammered during an October 2015 flood. The fort plans to make repairs at the Legion lakes and at Semmes Lake, a larger water body that also drained away when its dam blew out during the storm. But studies have been underway to determine whether the repair plan is viable.

The Army has been criticized since the storm over the condition of some dams on the base, most notably Semmes Lake. Inspections have found Semmes and a handful of the dams were in questionable shape before the storm roared through Columbia. Failure of the Semmes Lake dam and Lower Legion Lake dike contributed to flooding in a neighborhood downstream, residents said.

Fort Jackson announced last December that it wanted to make repairs at both Semmes Lake and lower Legion Lake.

  Comments