Education

Police: 10-year-olds tried to sell pot for dessert, bubblegum

Burnettown police said they don't know where two 10-year-old boys found more than three grams of marijuana or what prompted them to bring it to school and try to sell if for dessert and bubble gum, but they are not taking the matter lightly.

Classmates of the two Jefferson Elementary School fourth-graders approached their teachers last Thursday after the two boys tried to sell the marijuana.

The school's principal immediately took the drugs and called the police, said Burnettown Police Chief David Paul Smith.

"Right now, we believe this was an isolated incident," Smith said. But, what prompted two boys who have no family connection and little contact outside of school to bring drugs in on the same day is still unanswered.

Police said they do not believe the boys or any of the children at the elementary school smoked the drug or were in any serious danger.

Many of the children didn't know what the drug was.

The children who brought in the marijuana have changed their stories over and over, which Smith said makes getting to the bottom of the matter difficult.

Aiken Superintendent Dr. Beth Everitt said it is unusual for elementary students to bring drugs to school.

"We do take into account the age of the students in regard to discipline. There are certain mandatory disciplinary actions for things like drugs and alcohol," she said.

The Area 3 Advisory Council will be the first to consider the disciplinary matter, looking at the actions and the behavior of the students.

"Did they understand?" The Council will use that judgment in applying punishment.

So will family court, Smith said.

The police chief said the children knew they could sell the drugs for money, which raises concerns, but he said they also tried to sell it for pies and bubble gum.

Area 3 Assistant Superintendent Dr. Tim Yarborough said the advisory council has discretion and looks at each case individually, but the immediate reaction is to recom-mend an automatic expulsion recommendation.

He went on to say that there are a range of decisions that can be made.

-- Aiken Standard, McClatchy-Tribune Regional News

  Comments