Politics & Government

Heckled Haley tweets about being target of ‘hateful’ speech at Pride Parade

Nikki Haley confirmed UN Ambassador

The Senate confirmed South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley as UN Ambassador on Tuesday. Credit: CSPAN
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The Senate confirmed South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley as UN Ambassador on Tuesday. Credit: CSPAN

Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and former S.C. governor, took offense to being the target of “hate” speech Sunday.

Haley tweeted that she was part of a party, including her teenage son Nalin, that was heckled as they left lunch as New York’s annual Gay Pride Parade was taking place.

“We,incl my son, were booed by patrons saying hateful things as we left lunch @ Pride Parade,” Haley posted on Twitter, adding “Our country is better than this. #HateNeverWins

This is the first time the Pride Parade has been held with Donald Trump in the Oval Office. Pride leaders are anxious about President Trump’s agenda, and the parade was headed by groups more focused on protest than celebration. Grand marshals – including the American Civil Liberties Union – were chosen to represent facets of a “resistance movement.”

Haley and Trump haven’t always seen eye-to-eye, especially during the 2016 presidential campaign. But Haley has served as a surrogate for Trump as part of the administration and has been among its most vocal members.

That connection could make Haley a target for some of the vitriol intended for Trump.

LGBT activists have been galled by the Trump administration’s rollback of federal guidance advising school districts to let transgender students use the bathrooms and locker rooms of their choice. The Republican president also broke from Democratic predecessor Barack Obama’s practice of issuing a proclamation in honor of Pride Month.

People posting on social media are also taking Haley to task for some of the things she has said in the past.

One person said Haley was criticized for previously saying “defending gay marriage ban is her constitutional duty. Might have inspired a few boos.”

In November 2013, Haley opposed a federal lawsuit challening an amendment in South Carolina’s constitution that banned same-sex marriage.

“The citizens of South Carolina spoke … spoke something that I, too, believe, which is marriage should between a man and a woman,” Haley said at the time. “I’m going to stand by the people of this state, stand by the constitution, I’m going to support it and fight for it every step of the way.”

The incident could sour Haley on living in New York, something that would be 180 degrees opposite her perspective to this point. On Saturday evening, Haley tweeted a picture of the New York City skyline at dusk, saying “It never gets old....#LifeInNYC

Haley is currently the president of the Security Council, a job that rotates monthly between the five permanent members of the council; the U.S., Britain, China, France and Russia.

Haley has been one of the Trump administration’s most vocal members, taking a tough line on Russia and Syria and telling North Korea not to give the U.S. “a reason” to fight.

Haley, a Republican from Lexington, served as South Carolina’s governor for six years before resigning to join the Trump Administration.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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