Elections

Four more women accuse Donald Trump of sexual assault

Clinton thanks Republican supporters, Trump says her career is all talk - Election Rewind

As the presidential candidates near the homestretch of their campaigns, Hillary Clinton thanked those across the political aisle for their support while Donald Trump attacked her for being all talk and no action. Late night shows with the Bidens a
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As the presidential candidates near the homestretch of their campaigns, Hillary Clinton thanked those across the political aisle for their support while Donald Trump attacked her for being all talk and no action. Late night shows with the Bidens a

Welcome to McClatchy’s Voter Survival Guide, an interactive presentation of daily events from one of the strangest presidential campaigns in modern history.

Anderson Cooper’s dogged questioning of Donald Trump’s history with women during Sunday’s debate led to the latest revelation against the Republican nominee.

Four women, two who came forward to the New York Times one who spoke to the Palm Beach Post and a writer for People, say Trump inappropriately touched or kissed them.

“All of a sudden I felt a grab, a little nudge,” said Mindy McGillivray about an incident that occurred in 2003. “I think it’s Ken’s camera bag, that was my first instinct. I turn around and there’s Donald. He sort of looked away quickly. I quickly turned back, facing Ray Charles, and I’m stunned.’’

Trump’s campaign has denied all of the allegations and threatened to sue the New York Times.

"Your article is reckless, defamatory and constitutes libel per se," said Marc E. Kasowitz, a lawyer representing Trump, in a letter to Times executive editor Dean Baquet. "We hereby demand that you immediately cease any further publication of this article, remove it from your website and issue a full and immediate retraction and apology. Failure to do so will leave my client with no option but to purse all available actions and remedies."

Donald Trump lost a lot of Republican support after a hot mic captured the Republican nominee saying inappropriate things about women.

But days later four Republicans who called on Trump to step down changed course.

Sen. Deb Fischer (R-Neb.), Rep. Scott Garrett (R-N.J.) and Rep. Bradley Byrne (R-Ala.) all said that they will support the Republican nominee. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.) also said he would likely vote for Trump.

That’s in contrast to public statements the four made just days ago.

“I know you know I put out a statement on Friday and it was with regard to Mr. Trump’s comments,” Fischer said. “I felt they were disgusting. I felt they were unacceptable. But, I never said I was not voting for our Republican ticket.”

Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway said Republican lawmakers need to stop “pussyfooting around” when it comes to supporting the Republican nominee, a curious choice words considering the recent leaked video.

Evangelicals slammed Bill Clinton for marital infidelity, but appear to give Trump a pass for his latest comments.

The polls open nationally in 25 days. Let’s get started.

More allegations of sexual assault

During Sunday’s debate, moderator Anderson Cooper started an exchange with Trump about a lewd video that was released last Friday. Trump insisted the remarks were “locker room talk” and denied ever touching or kissing a woman inappropriately.

“For the record, are you saying that what you said on the bus 11 years ago, that you did not actually kiss women without consent or grope women without consent?” Cooper asked.

After some back-and-forth, Trump responded “And I will tell you, no I have not.”

That response emboldened four more women to come forward, saying Trump’s lied during the debate.

The endorsement dance

Republicans distanced themselves from Trump’s comments over the past few days, and the Republican nominee was quick to respond on social media.

But now some who called for Trump to leave the presidential race are re-endorsing. Rep. Scott Garrett of New Jersey called for Trump to leave the race but in a statement his campaign reaffirmed support.

“The truth is Scott Garrett’s position has been consistent from the beginning. On Saturday, he denounced Donald Trump’s reprehensible comments and said he believes in Mike Pence. Donald Trump remains the nominee of the Republican Party, and Rep. Garrett has always said he will vote for the Republican Party nominee.”

“He has a lot of work to do, I think, to win this election,” Thune said Wednesday. “But, I’m certainly not going to vote for Hillary Clinton.”

Trump chief uses interesting choice of words to denounce anti-Trump Republicans

Kellyanne Conway said Republicans need to stop “pussyfooting around” when it comes to supporting Trump, an interesting choice of words considering recent events.

“Well we want the support of anybody who’s going to publicly endorse us. But enough of the pussyfooting around in terms of, you know, do you support us or do you not support us?” Conway said. “The fact is that some of these leaders have been wishy-washy.”

But enough of the pussyfooting around in terms of, you know, do you support us or do you not support us?

Kellyanne Conway on Donald Trump

Evangelicals dance a political tightrope

During Clinton’s administration, social conservatives worried Bill Clinton’s misdeeds would ruin America.

Now, after Donald Trump’s lewd comments, many on the religious right are silent, or even openly supporting the Republican nominee.

“As Christians we are called to forgive, even as we’ve been forgiven,” vice presidential nominee Mike Pence said. That came asTrump’s campaign seized on Catholic comments reportedly made by a top Clinton staffer in an email published by WikiLeaks.

“If only on behalf of her Catholic running mate, Hillary Clinton should renounce those bigoted, anti-Catholic, anti-evangelical remarks,” Pence said.

We asked voters if they plan to vote in the 2016 presidential election, and if so, for whom. Now we want to know your thoughts! Call us: (978) 3-VOICES

Links of note

Could Clinton and Trump lose to an independent candidate in Utah? (McClatchy)

President Clinton’s America: Tax hikes for the rich, bigger government, cheaper college (McClatchy)

President Trump’s America: Lower taxes, higher deficits, fewer immigrants (McClatchy)

Latest Clinton emails are more embarrassing than damaging (NPR)

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Alex Daugherty: 202-383-6049, @alextdaugherty

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