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Post-convention job for SC Democrats: Get voters to polls

Democratic party leaders from South Carolina and Louisiana offer their thank-yous Thursday on the final day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.
Democratic party leaders from South Carolina and Louisiana offer their thank-yous Thursday on the final day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Steven Porter

South Carolina’s delegates to the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia turned their attention Thursday to the work ahead, preparing for a general election in a state that hasn’t voted blue in a presidential race for four decades.

“Remember when you were studying for final exams in school? If you actually liked college or graduate school, you really kind of got into it, and it was fun,” said delegate Ed Greenleaf of Columbia.

“This reminds me a whole heck of a lot of getting ready for the final exam, and it has been a very uplifting, very positive, very intensive three days,” Greenleaf said on the morning of the convention’s fourth and final day.

During breakfast, U.S. Rep. Cedric Richmond, D-La., told delegates from his state and South Carolina that they have their work cut out for them. “Register some people to vote,” Richmond said. “Answer the question for our young people: ‘Why bother?’ ”

The congressman said delegates should explain to apathetic voters that elections matter and that Americans can’t afford the consequences if Donald Trump prevails over Hillary Clinton. “So as we hear her tonight make history in her acceptance speech and outline her vision for where she wants to go, just remember she can’t go anywhere if we don’t go to work,” Richmond said.

Charleston County Councilwoman Colleen Condon, a delegate who has been speaking with Republicans about why they should vote for Clinton, said a Trump presidency would be disastrous for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.

“I’m absolutely committed to making sure that people who do not always vote understand this is the election that truly can affect their lives,” said Condon, who is a lesbian.

In order to affect public policy, Americans have to put in the work and vote, Condon said, adding this could be a history-making year for her state, as well as her country. “It is amazing to think South Carolina could actually be in play.”

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