North Carolina

First named storm is churning in Atlantic before hurricane season has started

A below-average hurricane season? A look at the names, early predictions for 2019

The 2019 Atlantic hurricane season runs June 1 through Nov. 30. Here's a look at the season's early predictions — and what this year's storms will be named.
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The 2019 Atlantic hurricane season runs June 1 through Nov. 30. Here's a look at the season's early predictions — and what this year's storms will be named.

Hurricane season doesn’t start until June 1 for the East Coast, but a system taking shape in the Atlantic on Monday has turned into the year’s first subtropical storm , according to the National Hurricane Center.

Subtropical Storm Andrea was confirmed by an Air Force Reserve hurricane reconnaissance plane that was looking at an area of showers and thunderstorms southwest of Bermuda, the National Weather Service’s Hurricane Center tweeted.

The system that was located “several hundred miles southwest of Bermuda” at 6 p.m. has developed a “well-defined center” the National Weather Service said.

Maximum sustained winds of 40 mph that extend outward up to 70 miles have been recorded in the storm, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Although the system has turned into a subtropical storm, it probably won’t last for long, the National Hurricane Center said. “Conditions are forecast to become unfavorable for further development by late Tuesday, and the disturbance is expected to merge with a cold front on Wednesday.”

The storm is expected to stay in the Atlantic Ocean, where it will weaken on Tuesday before dissipating on Wednesday, the National Hurricane Center said. There are no watches or warnings in effect.

The Atlantic hurricane season runs June 1 through Nov. 30.

Harrison County EMA director Rupert Lacy goes through a list of items you need to prepare for a hurricane, including a few things you may not have thought of.

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Charles Duncan covers what’s happening right now across North and South Carolina, from breaking news to fun or interesting stories from across the region. He holds degrees from N.C. State University and Duke and lives two blocks from the ocean in Myrtle Beach.

Noah Feit is a Real Time reporter with The State and McClatchy Carolinas Regional Team. The award-winning journalist has worked for multiple newspapers since starting his career in 1999.

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