Letters to the Editor

Tuesday's letters to the editor

Haley's ideology not what S.C. needs

Nikki Haley, Republican candidate for governor of South Carolina, may be well-intentioned, but her ideology will prevent her from "restoring public pride in her home state." According to Kathleen Parker's column, ("Haley ready to rumble," Nov. 27), Ms. Haley has one primary goal: cutting or even eliminating taxes, particularly small business and personal income taxes. Despite cultivating an image as a maverick or rogue, she is just another politician whose ideology is based on the belief that government is bad and business is good. If we continue to elect right-wing extremists rather than moderate pragmatists, our state will continue to lag behind the other states in education, good-paying jobs, health and the crime rate. As former President George W. Bush's record demonstrated, trickle-down economics doesn't work - except for the tricklers at the top.

ANTHONY J. DISTEFANO

Aiken

Medicare resolution needed Wilson vote

Everyone who is dependent on Medicare or Tricare for their health care needs should be aware of how Joe Wilson voted on H.R. 3961 recently. This resolution would amend title XVIII of the Social Security Act to reform the Medicare SGR payment system for physician reimbursement. If the act is not amended, there will be a statutory reduction of 21 percent in the amount Medicare will reimburse physicians, starting in January 2010. Joe Wilson was one of 183 representatives voting against this resolution. Many physicians have said that if the act is not amended, they will be forced to stop treating Medicare and Tricare patients. Everyone should remember that if they vote for Joe Wilson in the next election, they are casting a vote against their own best interests.

DONALD MORRIS

Columbia

Spending priorities are upside down

Why am I not surprised that Washington is now calling for a tax increase to fund the war in Afghanistan? This trick has been used by local governments for many years. Spend all the available money on unnecessary expenditures and pork barrel projects and when it gets down to necessary items like fire and police departments, they say they're out of money and need to raise taxes. Never mind that these items are primary expenditures and should have been planned for at the beginning.

As I understand it, the protection of this country is the primary job of the federal government, not an afterthought as it seems to be. Tax increases hurt everyone. I hope the voters are paying attention and have a long memory.

RALPH W. ROBERTS

Cayce

Senate health plan meets nation's needs

The U.S. Senate has released its health care reform plan, which would cover 31 million more Americans and reduce the budget deficit by $127 billion over the next 10 years. This is great news for all of us, as the legislation would give the insured more stability and security and offer affordable health care for those who don't have it now. And it will do so while lowering health care costs for families, businesses and governments.

The United States has needed to reform its health care system for a long time, but our leaders have lacked the will to address the problem forcefully. President Obama, by not wavering in his determination to finally fix the system, has finally made reform possible, despite the constant and sometimes ridiculous attacks by his opponents.

I congratulate the Senate for writing a bill that meets the president's goals of extending coverage and containing runaway health care costs and look forward to a system that serves us all efficiently and compassionately. Let's let our representatives know that we support health care reform as the debate moves to the Senate floor.

BRIDGET BIRCHETT TRIPP

Lexington

Abortion statistics paint dismal picture

As I read the article "Abortion Shouldn't Imperil Health Care Reform" on Sunday, I was extremely dismayed to read the following in the fourth paragraph: "the amendment would impact the more than one in four American women who have at least one abortion during their reproductive years. Tens of millions of women will be required to pay for health care coverage that expressly excludes one of their most commonly requested medical procedures." Abortion has become a common way for women to deal with pregnancy. Sloane Whelan said so. Over 50 million babies have been aborted since Roe versus Wade. How many more innocent lives will be sacrificed at the altar of convenience and/or the lack of self control? There are birth control alternatives and any one with half a conscience will take the effort to use them.

If America goes down the road Whelan and Planned Parenthood want us to travel, we'll never ever be able to say we are the land of the free and the home of the brave, again.

KAREN PARRISH

Lexington

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