Letters to the Editor

Training for ‘middle-skill’ jobs would solve SC job crisis

In the Midlands, we are not producing enough workers to meet the needs of many of local employers, especially in fields such as information technology, manufacturing, engineering technologies and construction technologies.
In the Midlands, we are not producing enough workers to meet the needs of many of local employers, especially in fields such as information technology, manufacturing, engineering technologies and construction technologies. AP file photo

A recent State article on the economic development priorities of the two primary gubernatorial candidates noted that South Carolina has a low unemployment rate and – more troubling – a very low workforce participation rate. In the Midlands, as a consequence of these trends, we are not producing enough workers to meet the needs of many of local employers, especially in fields such as information technology, manufacturing, engineering technologies and construction technologies.

This is especially true for “middle-skill” jobs that require more than a high school diploma but not necessarily a four-year degree. The S.C. Department of Employment and Workforce indicates that 45 percent of the state’s available jobs are in “middle-skill” positions, but only 29 percent of available workers meet the hiring needs for these positions.

At Midlands Technical College (MTC), we are continuing attract an increasing number of recent high school graduates who are enrolling in programs that provide students with a pathway to transfer to four-year institutions. But, unfortunately, we are not attracting a sufficient number of students enrolling in programs that help students gain the locally available “middle-skill” jobs.

At MTC, we offer numerous programs that can help the many underemployed or part-time workers, former military service members and individuals seeking a new career who could benefit from completing the education and training programs that lead to “middle-skill” jobs. We need to spread the word that there are many job opportunities for those who gain the skills needed to compete in today’s workforce.

Garry Powers

Columbia

GOP has sold their souls to the devil

That was an amazing display of ineptness on your behalf, Sen. Graham. Thank God Chuck Grassly is the head of the Judiciary Committee. Otherwise you would have been held in contempt of Congress when you interrupted the proceedings. That was such an embarrassing and pathetic display you put on. John McCain is already rolling over in his freshly dug grave over your performance. Since his death, and maybe shortly before, you have done a complete 180.

You Republicans are so afraid of losing control of Congress, it has forced Republicans to sell their souls to the devil. Donald Trump did an excellent job in coaching Brent Kavannah on his speech. It was as if we were listening to your president. Amazing. Kavannah displayed a level of instability that nobody in this country wants on the Supreme Court. What’s with his crying? Who in the world would discuss the details of this process with a 10-year-old girl (his daughter) to the point where the 10-year-old says we need to pray for this woman. Normal parents would shield their children from the details.

The fake tears were a total act.

Ronald Andersen

Winnsboro

Graham’s speech cemented him to any office

I haven't been a fan of Sen. Lindsey Graham in the past, but last Thursday when he gave his outstanding speech in the Senate hearing on Judge Kavanaugh, Sen. Graham won me over. His speech was one of the most outstanding speeches I have ever heard. He should have cemented himself to any office that he ever runs for in South Carolina or the nation. Sen. Graham, with his speech, made South Carolina proud and made himself proud. Thank you, Sen. Graham, for standing up for what was right and what is right.

Dave Hill

Orangeburg

The State publishes a cross section of the letters we receive from South Carolinians in order to provide a forum for our community and also to allow our community to get a good look at itself, for good or bad. The letters represent the views of the letter writers, not necessarily of The State.

  Comments