Letters to the Editor

Instruction manual on Boeing’s new plane left something out?

Officials inspect an engine recovered the crashed Lion Air jet in Jakarta, Indonesia, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018. The brand new Boeing 737 MAX 8 jet plunged into the Java Sea just minutes after takeoff from Jakarta early on Oct. 29, killing all of its passengers on board. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)
Officials inspect an engine recovered the crashed Lion Air jet in Jakarta, Indonesia, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018. The brand new Boeing 737 MAX 8 jet plunged into the Java Sea just minutes after takeoff from Jakarta early on Oct. 29, killing all of its passengers on board. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim) AP

189 unnecessary deaths due to a company’s incompetence.

Last month, a Boeing 737, one of Boeing’s new planes, crashed into the Java Sea in Indonesia killing all passengers and crew on board. At first, the press had a field day putting the blame on the pilots not being able to handle keeping the plane in the air when a stall happens. An automatic software system put in by Boeing was designed to help the pilots get control of the plane and bring the plane back to normal flying conditions. The pilots, according to the black boxes recovered, could not understand the complex steps needed to get control back to fly it to the airport.

Do you know why the pilots could not figure out the problems they faced? It was because Boeing never put the instructions in their manual sent to every airline who owned a Boeing 737 on how to handle a stall. They left them out and recently announced they just sent the instructions now to be put in their manual. So all you businesspeople who fly for a living on 737s, let’s hope your plane has received their copy.

Pat Clark

Columbia

Early detection can help those suffering from lung cancer

Every two and a half minutes, someone in the U.S. is told that they have lung cancer, and the average five-year survival rate remains among the lowest for all types of cancers. But people at high risk for lung cancer can be screened, which is aimed at finding cancer early, when it’s most treatable.

As a cancer researcher, I have been involved in several studies aimed at increasing awareness and knowledge about lung cancer screening using low-dose CT among health care providers and the public. These studies have shown the importance of patient’s being engaged in their own health care decisions.

More needs to be done to raise awareness of lung cancer and the availability of lifesaving lung cancer screening. In South Carolina, there are more than 20 lung cancer screening programs located across all regions of the state.

I encourage South Carolina residents who smoked for many years or still smoke to visit SavedByTheScan.org to take an easy lung cancer screening eligibility quiz and learn if they may be at high risk and eligible for screening. Talk to your primary care provider about whether lung cancer screening might be beneficial for you or your loved one.

Jan Marie Eberth

Columbia

Animal abusers need harsher punishment

Reading about people who abuse animals always breaks my heart, but I did read your article about the men who abused several pit bull dogs in Columbia.

I began to wonder about these individuals. Will they be forbidden from owning another animal EVER? If they are employed, will their wages be taken to pay for the treatment of these dogs? Will they have to work in an animal shelter to try to make some small amends? Are the penalties so light for animal abuse that it won’t change anything? Will they be up to their sordid deeds right away again?

Personally, I would like to find out what sort of punishment they receive. Maybe it will deter other offenders. Child molester’s names are made public to protect children, why not publish the names of animal abusers on a central website? In my opinion, when people commit heinous crimes, they should lose all rights to privacy.

Finally, what can decent, compassionate people do increase the punishment for people who commit these unspeakable crimes?

Carla Martinez

Gilbert

The State publishes a cross section of the letters we receive from South Carolinians in order to provide a forum for our community and also to allow our community to get a good look at itself, for good or bad. The letters represent the views of the letter writers, not necessarily of The State.

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