Letters to the Editor

PSC’s approval of Dominion buyout of SCANA will continue to cost ratepayers

Protestors briefly interrupted a meeting on Dec. 14 of the S.C. Public Service Commission before the commission voted to set SCE&G's electric rates moving forward and to approve Dominion Energy's offer to buy SCE&G's parent company, SCANA.
Protestors briefly interrupted a meeting on Dec. 14 of the S.C. Public Service Commission before the commission voted to set SCE&G's electric rates moving forward and to approve Dominion Energy's offer to buy SCE&G's parent company, SCANA. tglantz@thestate.com

Business as usual at the PSC.

No one could have expected the PSC to decide in favor of the ratepayer considering their history. They still have not learned how to say “no” to the politicians or the utility. When will we get representatives on this board that truly understand the electric industry? No time soon I’m sure. The same politicians that passed the act that got us into this mess appoint the members of the PSC. Can we really believe that they have no influence over the vote? How can any educated person not believe that, by allowing other utilities to bid, the offer would have been better?

It always comes down to money, and I’m sure in the future Dominion will be dolling out the campaign dollars to those that stood in their corner.

As for us ratepayers, we just have to suck it up and continue to pay for SCANA’s multibillion-dollar hole in the ground and, with this PSC, face more rate increases down the road so Dominion can recover the rest of their money.

Merry Christmas to those inept SCANA executives that walk away with millions. I guess it pays to be bad.

Dean Bain

Blythewood

What if men held each other accountable for atrocities that ruin lives?

What if your daughter, your neighbor, your grandchild had been sexually abused, humiliated and had her innocence destroyed? What if you had been able to see the child molester’s actions through a peephole? What would you have expected? Jeffery Epstein, who perpetrated such actions on many young girls, escaped the full judgment of the justice system because of his wealth, power and influence (and perhaps because he was not black). His billionaire status gave him the ability to strike a plea deal with Alexander Acosta, the present Labor Secretary under Trump. At the time of Epstein’s abuses, Acosta was an attorney in Miami, Florida. Epstein’s supreme wealth and power allowed him to get a very light sentence.

Epstein, it seems, plays by the same rule book as Donald Trump, Les Moonves, Harvey Weinstein, Eric Schneiderman and other powerful men who have been revealed as serial abusers of girls and women. Epstein’s penalty? – a scant 13-month stay in a nicer wing of a county jail – where he was allowed to spend 12 hours a day, six days a week, at his office. We must end the culture of powerful men enabling each other while dismissing or abusing women and children.

What if men as well as women rose in protest? What if men held each other accountable for the atrocities that ruin lives? As an English teacher for one year in a prison facility that held teenage sex offenders, I saw the culture of misguided thinking. THEY had no time off, very clear rules, daily counseling and encouragement to read good literature, to write and to evaluate.

Nancy Larsen

Lugoff

Why don’t SC voters oppose outrageous spending of public’s money?

Recently, I received an email that started out, “A little-known state law allows eligible judges in South Carolina to receive generous retirement pay for up to as much as a dozen years at the same time they are collecting their regular six-figure salaries.” It goes on to say that these same judges want a 33 percent pay increase and a like increase in their retirement pay.

This neither shocks me nor even surprises me, since South Carolina state legislators can do the same thing. How else could these legislators guarantee that this would be legal if they didn’t cut the judges in on this opulent perk?

It also no longer surprises me that the South Carolina Legislature has not corrected this outrageous spending of the public’s money.

What shocks me to this day is that not enough South Carolina taxpaying voters care enough to scream loud enough to correct this abuse.

This kind of largess is certainly not indicative of “It’s a great day in South Carolina”.

Warner Wells

Columbia

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