Letters to the Editor

Public Service Commission proves it is not working for the SCE&G customers

Protestors briefly interrupted a meeting of the S.C. Public Service Commission earlier this month before the commission voted to set SCE&G's electric rates moving forward and to approve Dominion Energy's offer to buy SCE&G's parent company, SCANA.
Protestors briefly interrupted a meeting of the S.C. Public Service Commission earlier this month before the commission voted to set SCE&G's electric rates moving forward and to approve Dominion Energy's offer to buy SCE&G's parent company, SCANA. The State file photo

I am sorely disappointed with the decision the PSC made for Dominion. “For” being the operative word. I thought the Public Service Commission was intended “for” the public.

The way the reports revealed what SCE&G lied about and did not reveal pertinent information to the PSC to get rate increases surely showed the Base Load Review Act needed to be discarded. Instead it is still in tact because of the PSC. The customers still have to continue paying for the abandoned V.C. Summer reactor site with nothing to show for it.

SCE&G is going to be free of any punishment for their deception. Dominion will continue customer billing as they see fit. The customers will not know if or when they are getting billed the way they should. There is no way to get further details from the PSC.

The PSC is apparently like deity. The PSC can not be reached by the public, ever. They are appointed by the legislature and can not be fired. How can the PSC truly be trusted to speak for the public ? All of the news reporting on the V.C. Sumner site was nothing more than a dog-and-pony show to make the customers believe they had the PSC working for them. Thanks for nothing PSC.

Jim Matthews

Columbia

Paying off accuser may be immoral, but it’s not illegal

It is once again amazing to me that the media is so bent on smashing anything Trump does that the whole nation has a lower opinion of the media than they do of the Congress and president.

The “Paying of hush money that Trump did is illegal” – It is not. As a matter of fact, the Congress of the United States has set up a slush fund funded by the taxpayers of this country for the sole purpose of paying off anyone who accuses one of their members who is accused of something immoral or unsavory.

People, it is ridiculous for the media, members of Congress, the president or anyone else to condemn a private citizen to have his lawyer arrange to pay off an accuser to keep quite with hush money paid to a gold digger who is just trying to blackmail a person’s reputation. It may be immoral and sneaky, but it is not illegal. Using taxpayer money to set up a hush money fund for members of Congress is immoral and illegal in my view because it is not even using the accused money. It is using our money and should be abolished. This should be illegal if anything is illegal.

And remember citizens, it is the lawyers of this country who really benefit from these cases, not the accusers.

Allen Danielsen

Gilbert

Citizens should take more active role in SC’s economic fate

Recently the world got the news that General Motors was going to close three of its plants in the U.S. and ship those operations to Mexico. Some people said that they were surprised, that it was unfair, and that GM didn’t care. But just like in everyday life, one must pay attention to their environment. Of all the thousands of people working at the plant, someone should have noticed that orders were going down, a lack of investment in updated equipment, and just plain talk around the plant should have alerted people to the fact that these plants were going to close.

We must realize that companies make decisions based on who can make the best offer on tax breaks, location and even access to new markets. In our state growth, industrial growth has been dynamic. However, the average citizen does not know what kind of offer was put on the table. Just a few companies can determine the economic fate of our state if they decide to move out. We have experienced this once with textiles.

It is up to the citizens of S.C. to determine our involvement with companies that we cannot control.

James Muldrow

Columbia

The State publishes a cross section of the letters we receive from South Carolinians in order to provide a forum for our community and also to allow our community to get a good look at itself, for good or bad. The letters represent the views of the letter writers, not necessarily of The State.

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