Letters to the Editor

Methodists taught to love everyone as they love themselves, as God loves all His creations

In this Feb. 26, 2019, file photo, Ed Rowe, left, Rebecca Wilson, Robin Hager and Jill Zundel react to the defeat of a proposal that would allow LGBT clergy and same-sex marriage within the United Methodist Church at the denomination's 2019 Special Session of the General Conference in St. Louis, Mo. The church ended a pivotal conference on Feb. 26 in a seemingly irreconcilable split over same-sex marriage and the ordination of LGBT clergy.
In this Feb. 26, 2019, file photo, Ed Rowe, left, Rebecca Wilson, Robin Hager and Jill Zundel react to the defeat of a proposal that would allow LGBT clergy and same-sex marriage within the United Methodist Church at the denomination's 2019 Special Session of the General Conference in St. Louis, Mo. The church ended a pivotal conference on Feb. 26 in a seemingly irreconcilable split over same-sex marriage and the ordination of LGBT clergy. AP

When I became a Methodist, I accepted the doctrine of the United Methodist Church and declared I would support the United Methodist Church with my time, tithes and talents. I assumed the clergy, those ordained elders of the United Methodist Church, promised to abide by and hold fast to the same doctrine. I guess certain ordained elders now assume they must be “more like the world” to grow Christ’s church, but what we profess and what we do is not a game of winning or losing. As Christians, we are commanded to “do the work of Jesus Christ” in all parts of the world and “to love our neighbors as ourselves.”

My earthly father told me he loved me, but he did not approve of my behaviors, so I did modify my behaviors to be acceptable to my earthly father. My father’s acceptance was important, not what my friends or society thought was acceptable. I also modified my behaviors so that I live within the forgiveness of my Heavenly Father. We often confuse the recognition of inappropriate behavior as a rejection of the individual. I believe God loves all His creations. Just a view from the pew…..

David Busby

West Columbia

Church welcomes LGBTQ community with open arms

The recent events involving church and the LGBTQ community has unfolded into a painful experience for so many.

The United Methodist Church decided to stand on the side of an archaic interpretation of scripture and stand against so many to whom they are supposed to open their hearts, their minds and their doors.

Skye Moore, a beloved teacher at Chapin Baptist Church, was walked down the hall to the pastor’s office and terminated for what appears to be no other reason than her sexual orientation. In the fog of all these events, it would be easy to think that church and the LGBTQ community exist in a state of conflict.

The Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Columbia sides with love against these acts of injustice. We are a church that absolutely opposes the actions of the UMC and Chapin Baptist Church. We covenant to affirm the inherent worth and dignity of every human, with no conditions. We don’t tell you who you SHOULD be, but rather we affirm who you understand yourself to be. To the LGBTQ community, please know that we are a church that stands with you, and you are welcome here!

Stephen Robinson

Columbia

SC legislators should ensure that gender equality becomes a priority

It’s apparent when Reps. Gilda Cobb-Hunter and Wendy Brawley proposed an amendment to H.3139 to reduce the gender pay gap, they considered that over 15 percent of households in South Carolina are headed by female breadwinners and only get 82 percent of the wages their male colleagues get paid. This discrimination between the sexes has got to stop!

Women should not work abstemiously for free when South Carolina legislators have the responsibility to ensure that gender equality, which is an alienable right, becomes a social priority. Men and women are created equal and should get equal pay.

Bridget Deline

Columbia

Pain patients suffer most from strict opioid rules

I am a 68-year-old retired nurse, wife, mother, grandmother and pain patient. I have five well-documented illnesses that require opioid therapy. I have been on this treatment for 30 years with no problems. I follow each and every rule of the pain clinic. Prior to prescribing these medications my doctors tried every form of treatment there was.

Today, due to the overcorrected guidelines of the CDC that were put into effect from President Trump’s opioid team, people like myself are being forced off their medicine. This was not meant to happen. The government has threatened doctors with loss of their license if they prescribe. They in turn cancel their pain patients’ contracts for no reason.

The American Medical Association no longer supports the CDC guidelines. It wants them thrown out.

This crisis is fentanyl/heroin not opioid caused by doctors. Pain patients need TV and media to cover the real story. There is much false information advertised, but I can’t prove it in a few short words. I am member DontPunishPainRally.com. Our nationwide protest group has grown to 10,000. We are still unable to get media attention in S.C.

Joyce Dowling

Little River

The State publishes a cross section of the letters we receive from South Carolinians in order to provide a forum for our community and also to allow our community to get a good look at itself, for good or bad. The letters represent the views of the letter writers, not necessarily of The State.

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