Letters to the Editor

Wealthy have always gotten privileges, not just during college bribery scandal

This combination of images shows college campuses, clockwise from top left, Georgetown University, Stanford University, Yale University, and University of California, Los Angeles. Prosecutors said dozens of parents paid bribes to alter their children’s test scores or get them into these and other colleges. The scandal underscored deep divisions on issues of class, privilege and race that are dominant themes in the political debate and part of daily discussions by regular Americans.
This combination of images shows college campuses, clockwise from top left, Georgetown University, Stanford University, Yale University, and University of California, Los Angeles. Prosecutors said dozens of parents paid bribes to alter their children’s test scores or get them into these and other colleges. The scandal underscored deep divisions on issues of class, privilege and race that are dominant themes in the political debate and part of daily discussions by regular Americans. AP

What is all the indignation being expressed about the children of the wealthy having their way bought into college? The wealthy can always use their money to manipulate any aspect of American life.

Take fore example the Paul Manafort sentence, do you think a less than wealthy person would have gotten the light sentence he got for the millions of dollars he stole? There are frequent stories of wealthy embezzlers being given probation.

The rich can easily game the system to shield their income and property from being taxed. Whole coastlines and natural areas of wonder can be destroyed to increase the fortunes of the privileged.

Bribing your way into college seems to be one of the less egregious offenses they get away with.

Terry Jarvis

Gilbert

SC is not addressing proper education problems

Let’s talk about education in South Carolina. As far back as I can remember, our fine state has had a very low rating for educating our people as a whole. We have thrown tons of money at the problem periodically and we still have the poor ratings. I recall some years ago that we, the working taxpayers, were promised that if we just agreed to adding a penny to our state sales tax, there would be a cure to the problem.

Next we were told if we just allowed the “Education Lottery,” that our system would be fixed. Still today we continue to have the poor ratings and our legislature is plotting how to extract more money for education.

I suggest we are not addressing toe proper problems. Why don’t we convene a committee of teachers and select administrators and ask them what needs to be done?

Maybe we could address:

  • Poor student preparation for learning resulting from nonfunctional families.
  • The lack of being able to discipline “out of line” students in meaningful ways.
  • Creating ways to let each student attain their personal best.
  • Where has all of the money gone from the increased sales tax and the lottery?
  • Why do new schools have elaborate art and sculpture when all that is needed is a comfortable and safe learning environment?
  • Why do teachers have to dig into their personal funds to buy classroom supplies?
  • Reward real learning, not preparation for standard testing.

This approach just might yield some real solutions!

F.C Dent Jr.

Lexington

Church picks, chooses which scripture to follow

Stephen Robinson’s response to the firing of Skye Moore due to her sexual orientation by the Chapin Baptist Church (March 10) was strident to say the least. (IMO and absent the facts, the firing of Ms. Moore may have been an overreach.) Robinson goes on and blasts the United Methodist Church for its stand against same-sex relationships by clergy. Robinson states that the UMC’s stand is on the side of an “archaic interpretation of scripture.” He goes on to say that his church, the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Columbia, is against the actions of the UMC and the Chapin Baptist Church.

The UMC’s stance is based on an “archaic interpretation of scripture?” Here we have the perfect example of a church who has a smorgasbord approach to scripture – picking and choosing what they agree with, and disregarding what they don’t agree with.

In 2Timothy 3:16-17, St. Paul writes, “All scripture is God breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness.” A few verses later, St. Paul writes, “For the time will come when men will not put up with sound doctrine.” Undoubtedly, those verses of scripture would be archaic to Mr. Robinson and the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Columbia.

Tom Fincher

Chapin

The State publishes a cross section of the letters we receive from South Carolinians in order to provide a forum for our community and also to allow our community to get a good look at itself, for good or bad. The letters represent the views of the letter writers, not necessarily of The State.

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