Letters to the Editor

Legislators have only one option to remove debt from customers: sell Santee Cooper

SCANA and Santee Cooper, its partner in building two nuclear-powered plants to generate electricity, shut down construction at the site in 2017. Ratepayers have been paying for years for the plants being built in Fairfield County.
SCANA and Santee Cooper, its partner in building two nuclear-powered plants to generate electricity, shut down construction at the site in 2017. Ratepayers have been paying for years for the plants being built in Fairfield County. The State file photo

SCANA customers have been paying heavily for years for the failed V.C. Summer nuclear project. Their rates increased right away to start paying down the debt. Now those customers are receiving checks for pennies. We Santee Cooper, co-op and municipal customers haven’t been hit yet. Sure, we’ve seen slight increases in our power bills, but they are a drop in the bucket to what’s coming. It’s kind of shocking to think that Santee Cooper direct, co-op and municipal customers like me still have more than $4 billion to pay for the failed project.

Santee Cooper executives admitted in a SC. state Senate hearing last spring that our power bills will go up by 15% to cover the nuclear debt and will stay that way for decades.

SCANA customers saw no real relief, but it doesn’t have to be that way for Santee Cooper customers. The legislature will soon have three options for what to do with Santee Cooper. There is only one option that removes the debt burden from Santee Cooper, co-op and municipal customers’ shoulders, and that is selling Santee Cooper. I don’t know about you, but that sounds like real relief to me.

Lee Padgett

Georgetown

It’s time for SC to get out of the electric utility business

As a freedom-loving American and a citizen of the state of South Carolina, I believe that the less governments do, the better they are.

Therefore, I am a strong proponent to sell the state-owned Santee Cooper electric enterprise. It has been a disaster for customers who are paying high rates that are going much higher as a result of the legislative disaster the abandoned nuclear plant deal has dumped on us. And, how is it that the Santee Cooper executives get rewarded with tens of millions of dollars in bonuses and gold-plated retirements for leaving Santee Cooper customers with a $4 billion bill for a hole in the ground that was supposed to be a nuclear power plant?

I understand the legislature has put Santee Cooper up for sale yet the board in its wisdom recently decided to set a record for executive pay and spend millions hiring a new CEO and his hand-picked deputy.

South Carolina should not be in the electric utility business, especially when investor-owned utilities are willing to buy Santee Cooper and deliver lower rates.

Larry Richardson

Myrtle Beach

Save-A-Lot was destined to fail because it sold more than groceries

I have just finished the article on the Save-A-Lot closure. I was in the grocery business for 46 years as a store director of an $800,000 a week unit. I have been retired for 16 years. The reason I am sending this letter is to advise you of a solution for the store. I knew when that store first opened it would not be successful. A fully stocked grocery sells too many items not related to food such as drugs, which is a magnet for theft.

I believe a solution for the problem of supplying food for the needy people of the ares would be an Aldi food store. Their prices are great. They stock all you need to supply you and your family with nutritional food to feed your family. This type of store without drugs, etc., will not attract the element who robs the store blind which makes it impossible for the store to make a profit.

Joe Stankovics

Columbia

The State publishes a cross section of the letters we receive from South Carolinians in order to provide a forum for our community and also to allow our community to get a good look at itself, for good or bad. The letters represent the views of the letter writers, not necessarily of The State.

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