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Myrtle Beach airport opens Quiet Room for children with autism

Myrtle Beach International Airport has partnered with the Champion Autism Network (CAN) to provide a "quiet room," in an effort to sooth those with autism upon their arrival in Myrtle Beach. The room is located adjacent to the baggage claim.
Myrtle Beach International Airport has partnered with the Champion Autism Network (CAN) to provide a "quiet room," in an effort to sooth those with autism upon their arrival in Myrtle Beach. The room is located adjacent to the baggage claim. jlee@thesunnews

A new room is opening inside the Myrtle Beach International Airport on Tuesday for passengers with autism or other disabilities who need some quiet time after a flight.

Discretely marked with the words “Quiet Room” on its glass-paneled door, the stress-free haven of pillowed and cushioned cubicles and seats is located in the airport’s baggage claim area. The room makes Myrtle Beach International one of only two airports in the country to support families with children on the autism spectrum disorder and with other disabilities by offering them a room of their own.

The Champion Autism Network, the Horry County Airport Administration and the Myrtle Beach Area Chamber of Commerce will celebrate the official opening of the new room at 10 a.m. Tuesday.

“This is a wonderful partnership and a victory for families of children with autism who are vacationing in our area,” said Becky Large, executive director of the Champion Autism Network. “This room provides a safe and fun environment for children on the autism spectrum and a caregiver to relax and decompress after a flight while family members retrieve their baggage and rental car.”

Congressman Tom Rice, Horry County Council Chairman Mark Lazarus, Horry County Council Vice Chairman Tyler Servant and Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Brad Dean are set to be guest speakers at Tuesday’s opening ceremony.

An estimated one in 68 children in the U.S. has been diagnosed with autism, a range of complex developmental brain disorders that affects children in varying degrees from communication difficulties and social and behavioral challenges to repetitive behaviors.

For more information, visit www.championautismnetwork.com or Champion Autism Network on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ChampionAutismNetwork

Emily Weaver: 843-444-1722, @TSNEmily

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