Crime & Courts

An SC prison guard was paid by inmate to pick up drugs. Now she’s an inmate too, agency says

‘A crisis in contraband’: 14 SC corrections employees arrested for taking bribes

United States Attorney District of South Carolina Beth Drake announces the indictment of 14 employees of the Department of Corrections for accepting bribes and bringing contraband into SC prisons.
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United States Attorney District of South Carolina Beth Drake announces the indictment of 14 employees of the Department of Corrections for accepting bribes and bringing contraband into SC prisons.

A former South Carolina prison guard who was paid by an inmate to bring a package of drugs into the facility is now an inmate herself, according to the S.C. Department of Corrections.

Janean Lateefah Dunbar, 41, was found guilty by a jury on charges of possession with intent to distribute marijuana, furnishing contraband to an inmate and misconduct in office, Edgefield County court records show.

Circuit Court Judge William Keesley sentenced Dunbar to 10 years, suspended to service of six years and five years’ probation, the Department of Corrections said Monday in announcing Dunbar’s sentence.

The charges stemmed from Dunbar’s June 2018 arrest at Trenton Correctional Institution in Edgefield County, where she was paid by an inmate to bring drugs into the facility, according to the news release.

Arrest warrants state Dunbar brought a package containing 86 grams of methamphetamine, 408 grams of marijuana, blunt wraps and cigars into the facility. Dunbar told investigators an inmate paid her $1,000 to pick up the package and bring it to the facility.

This was one of the longest sentences imposed on a corrections officer in recent years, according to the Department of Corrections.

“I’d like to thank Solicitor Rick Hubbard and his team for prosecuting this very serious matter,” corrections director Bryan Stirling said in the release. “Anytime someone brings contraband into an institution and breaks the public trust, there needs to be consequences.”

Teddy Kulmala covers breaking news for The State and covered crime and courts for seven years in Columbia, Rock Hill, Aiken and Lumberton, N.C. He graduated from Clemson University and grew up in Barnwell County.
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