Environment

Plan to remove a hazardous chemical from the Congaree River is back on track

Effort to dredge coal tar from the Congaree River is back on track

SCANA and DHEC have revived plans to remove toxic coal tar from the Congaree River in Columbia South Carolina. This video was produced in 2015 and looked at the original dredging plan. The new plan is a similar proposal, but scaled back slightly.
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SCANA and DHEC have revived plans to remove toxic coal tar from the Congaree River in Columbia South Carolina. This video was produced in 2015 and looked at the original dredging plan. The new plan is a similar proposal, but scaled back slightly.

A dangerous substance mucking up the Congaree River could be cleaned out.

State environmental regulators are instructing SCE&G to move forward with a plan to excavate the majority of coal tar where it is most prevalent in the river, according to a letter to the utility from the state Department of Health and Environmental Control.

Coal tar is a goopy black byproduct of manufacturing gas, which SCE&G made at a plant near the river from the 1800s to the 1950s. The chemical leached into the river over that time, it’s believed. The toxins are hazardous to people’s health, as well as to fish and wildlife. About 40,000 tons of the toxic sludge sit in the riverbed, covering about 11 acres, The State reported in 2017.

The new approach brings back a project that was first proposed by the Department of Health and Environmental Control in 2013 that called for building temporary dams to remove the nearly 40,000 tons of toxic sludge. That plan was abandoned in 2016 due to cost and feasibility, and the next year regulators approved a new method to cap the reservoirs of coal tar with fabric and stone. Last year, the environmental protection agency said that the utility was misleading in its justification to throw out the removal project and pushed SCE&G to revive the plan to dig out the coal tar.

Now that plan is about to be floated again and looks to be what SCE&G will be required to do. Previous estimates to remove the substance put the cost at $18.5 million.

An environmental group praised the state’s move.

“Congaree Riverkeeper has worked on the coal tar issue since the tar was discovered in the river in 2010, and has long advocated for the tar to be removed,” said Bill Stangler, head of the river advocacy group. “This new plan is a significant improvement from where we were just a year ago, and while there is a lot of work left to do, this is an important step in the right direction.”

A public meeting about the new plan is scheduled for April 2 at 6:30 p.m. in the Canal Room at EdVenture Children’s Museum in Columbia.

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David Travis Bland won the South Carolina Press Association’s 2017 Judson Chapman Award for community journalism. As The State’s crime, police and public safety reporter, he strives to inform communities about crimes that affect them and give deeper insight into victims, the accused and law enforcement. He studied history with a focus on the American South at the University of South Carolina.
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