Environment

‘Evil’ person who shot blowgun darts through ducks is being hunted by SC rescue group

Carolina Water Fowl Rescue is looking for the suspects responsible for abusing ducks.
Carolina Water Fowl Rescue is looking for the suspects responsible for abusing ducks. Facebook screen grab

The hunt is on for the person or persons who recently tortured ducks in South Carolina.

Carolina Waterfowl Rescue is offering a reward for the conviction of the suspect, or suspects, accused of maiming ducks, according to a post on its Facebook page.

Injured ducks were discovered near the Murrells Inlet International Golf Course, according to the Facebook post made Saturday.

The ducks appear to have been shot with blowgun darts. The post included photos of waterfowl with darts going through their head and neck.

The good news is the ducks survived the abuse. But Carolina Waterfowl Rescue has not been able to render aid to the animals — yet.

In addition to the suspect responsible for torturing the ducks, the animal rescue group is also trying to capture the ducks themselves to treat the injuries.

Because the ducks are “flighted,” it has presented a challenge, according to Kimberly Cerimele, a rescuer who replied to a comment on the Facebook post. Cerimele said Saturday was the third day she attempted to rescue the ducks, but she remained confident, saying, “We will get them.”

Many more of the comments were made by people outraged by those responsible for the torture. Several responses on the post called the suspect “evil,” “sick,” “sadistic,” and “cruel,” and other profane terms, while saying they wanted to have the person brought to justice.

The Facebook post also serves as a fundraiser, which had raised more than $700 as of 3 p.m. Sunday.

This is not the only instance of ducks being shot by blowgun darts. Geese, rabbits, squirrels and other animals have also been targeted, McClatchy reported.

“This is illegal harassment of wildlife. It’s something we take very seriously. But we need the public’s help catching whoever is doing this,” Pikes Peak region wildlife manager Frank McGee said about an incident very similar to what has occurred in South Carolina.

Witnessing animal abuse can be difficult, but according to the Humane Society of the Unites States, it is important not to turn away from animal cruelty. Here are tips to help stop animal abuse.

Related stories from The State in Columbia SC

Noah Feit is a Real Time reporter with The State and McClatchy Carolinas Regional Team. The award-winning journalist has worked for multiple newspapers since starting his career in 1999.

  Comments