Elections

Mark Sanford is Trump’s ‘biggest Republican threat,’ movie star tweets, echoing op-ed

Rep. Mark Sanford on Trump’s NAFTA threats

US Rep. Mark Sanford says ending NAFTA, as Trump has threatened, would be catastrophic. Sanford and other members of SC's legislative delegation spoke to the SC Chamber of Commerce Wednesday, August 23.
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US Rep. Mark Sanford says ending NAFTA, as Trump has threatened, would be catastrophic. Sanford and other members of SC's legislative delegation spoke to the SC Chamber of Commerce Wednesday, August 23.

Mark Sanford found a potentially unlikely ally in his corner as he works to defeat President Donald Trump in 2020.

Tuesday, actress and activist Mia Farrow of Rosemary’s Baby fame tweeted a New York Times opinion piece penned by Republican strategist Liz Mair, in which Mair lays out why she thinks the former S.C. governor warrants the greatest threat to Trump’s re-election bid.

“Mark Sanford, a true conservative, is the biggest Republican threat to Trump,” tweeted Farrow, echoing bits of Fair’s opinion piece into her tweet. “He is unlikely to be defined by Never Trumpism and more likely to campaign on the threat of runaway deficits and debts.”

Farrow is no fan of Trump based on her past tweets. But she doesn’t appear to lean Republican either.

In 2016, Farrow called then-Democratic candidate for president U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont “pretty great.”

“He doesn’t pander, is consistent and clear on important issues,” she wrote.

Sanford declared his long-shot presidential bid Sunday morning in an interview with Fox News’ Chris Wallace.

Former Illinois Congressman Joe Walsh and former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld also have put up primary challenges to Trump.

All three face a giant obstacle after several states, including South Carolina, decided to ditch their own 2020 GOP presidential primaries.

Sanford’s announcement came one day after the South Carolina Republican Party’s executive committee voted almost unanimously to skip the February 2020 presidential primary, citing Trump’s S.C. support and the $1.2 million it would take to put on the primary contest.

But, Mair writes in her op-ed, Sanford enters the Republican presidential race differently than his primary opponents.

Unlike Mr. Weld, Mr. Sanford has been a big-name player and an elected official in Republican politics in the Trump era, the Tea Party-dominated period that preceded it and the two decades before that,” Fair wrote. “He remains beloved by many conservative activists, who know he’s been serious about reining in wasteful spending, targeting debt and the deficit, and supporting free trade.”

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Maayan Schechter (My-yahn Schek-ter) covers the S.C. State House and politics for The State. She grew up in Atlanta, Ga. and graduated from the University of North Carolina-Asheville. She has previously worked at the Aiken Standard and the Greenville News.
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