Letters to the Editor

Kavanaugh’s daughter an example of Christian forgiveness

President Donald Trump, center, listens as retired Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, right, ceremonially swears-in Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, left, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, Oct. 8, 2018. Kavanaugh’s wife Ashley watches, second from right with daughters Margaret, left, and Liza.
President Donald Trump, center, listens as retired Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, right, ceremonially swears-in Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, left, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, Oct. 8, 2018. Kavanaugh’s wife Ashley watches, second from right with daughters Margaret, left, and Liza. AP file photo

When Judge Brett Kavanaugh defended himself before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 27, he wanted to make clear that he had no ill will toward his accuser, Dr. Ford. In fact, he said that when Liza, his 10-year-old daughter, was about to say her evening prayers, she said to her mother, “We should pray for that woman.”

Whatever you may think of the guilt or innocence of Judge Kavanaugh, he and his wife, Ashley, must be extraordinary parents. Just imagine a 10-year-old who is so full of Jesus that she feels a need to pray for the woman whose accusation could have destroyed her own father.

Liza may have offered the clearest Christian witness since the survivors of Mother Emmanuel Church in Charleston forgave a racist killer.

Jesus said, “But I tell you who hear me: Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you.” (Luke 6:27).

Seven hundred years before the birth of Jesus, the prophet Isaiah said, “…and a little child shall lead them.” (Isaiah 11:6).

The Rev. Bill Bouknight

Columbia

Cannabis: The solution to SC’s penson fund deficit

Although you will not hear anything about the state’s biggest crisis during the midterm elections as part of anyone’s campaign rhetoric, it should be foremost on the agenda. South Carolina’s pension fund faces a $24 billion deficit.

One of the solutions being promoted is the elimination of the defined benefit and moving future retirees into a 401K plan. Before we head down the path to 401K implosion, I would like to offer the following solution:

Legalize cannabis. This is an agriculture state that has a history of growing hemp for rope and other products. It is legal in several states and the entire country of Canada. Colorado, which has a similar population size, had sales of $1.5 billion in 2017. A 33 percent tax would raise $.5 billion a year. Dedicate these funds to the pension-fund shortage.

According to state treasurers report, we pay twice the national average in fees to Wall Street. End the sweetheart deals. This is an area in which we could save $200 million alone.

Tracy Hyman

Florence

Graham vulnerable as voters become independent thinkers

Since Sen. John McCain died, whom Trump said was no hero because he was captured, Sen. Lindsey Graham has bought a ticket on the Trump train and has gone astray from objective and honest views. He is concerned about primary opponents in 2020 and hears loud footsteps behind him that threaten his elected future. His recent poll numbers show he is vulnerable.

Voters are leaning more and more against partisan politics and acting more like the independent-thinking voters that most are. They are tired of political ideological extremists and those who put themselves before the long-term good of our country.

Graham probably noticed with trepidation President Trump’s recent praise of Nikki Haley, who has resigned from her high profile position at the U.N. Her political ambitions may lead her to challenge and defeat Graham in the Senate primary in 2020, with Trump’s support. There will probably be other challengers too, maybe even Mark Sanford.

Much in 2020 depends on where Trump’s posture with the public stands and who else runs in the Republican primary for Senate and president. This November’s Congressional election will also be insightful on what the future may hold.

Chester Sansbury

Columbia

The State publishes a cross section of the letters we receive from South Carolinians in order to provide a forum for our community and also to allow our community to get a good look at itself, for good or bad. The letters represent the views of the letter writers, not necessarily of The State.

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