Letters to the Editor

President Trump speaks truth without sugar-coating it

President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference in the East Room of the White House, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018, in Washington.
President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference in the East Room of the White House, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018, in Washington. AP

I believe the old adage “Keep it simple stupid” applies to President Trump most appropriately.

I’ve watched his rallies when he was running for office and, of late, watched him going around the country before the midterms to gin up his base and promote voting to keep Democrats from taking over the cCongress.

As an independent voter, I made no bones about chastising the news media for misinforming the public while backing up liars in the Democratic Party.

Trump’s language is unlike the former liar-in-chief whose words melted like butter dripping off his tongue every time he opened his mouth. Neither he nor his cohorts in deceit could be trusted from the very beginning when he promised the Wworld and gave us misery.

Trump, on the other hand, with his simple vocabulary has been checking off his list of promises one by one as the country thrives. He is a doer not a speaker with a sophisticated vocabulary who will mesmerize the masses into believing a lie. The Democrats on the other hand with their pathetic demands for Trump to tone down his language and not defend himself against numerous attacks have no moral compass to ask him to stop.

Being from the old school of “don’t believe anything you hear and only half of what you see,” I like what I see so far. I hope I’m not alone.

Gregory Topliff

Warrenville

Councilman’s receipts brings questions of county documentation

Richland County Council member Norman Jackson stated he submits his receipts “each month or so.” If the credit card bill arrives and receipts have not yet been submitted, is the credit card balance paid? Does the Ccounty routinely pay bills without documentation?

Lisa Buch

Columbia

Trump’s tax cuts were not passed to consumers

During my wife’s recent illness, I had the opportunity to shop for the two of us. It was a learning experience. Shopping for grits, groceries and other household goods is physically, mentally, emotionally and, even, spiritually more challenging and demanding than those of us who don’t do it think.

I also learned that, while I do not have the capacity to compile data and check facts as news media, I can confirm that President Trump’s veracity is suspect or worse. Contrary to his announcement during a Florida rally, you do not have to present identification to shop. Moreover, the constant insistence from the president, his spokeswomen and so many of his Congressional supporters that the corporate tax cuts would be passed on to consumers is a flat-out lie. The cost of living for food, fuel, and everything in between is rising. It is virtually impossible for a family, of four, even with two minimum wage earners, to provide healthy and nutritious food for three meals a day.

The boasting about the low unemployment and the strong stock market and economy may be good for those of us who are financially secure, even relatively so. However, our fellow Americans who live on the margins of society are suffering as much, if not more, than ever. A land of plenty, my foot.

Cermette Clardy Jr.

Isle of Palms

Unlike Trump, Obama never used hateful language

Nikki Haley was recently interviewed, saying that Trump should not be blamed for inciting violence with his rhetoric. After all, she said, no one blamed President Obama for the shooting at the church in Charleston. Excuse me, Ms. Haley, but you should not be disingenuous. As you well know, Obama never used the hateful, bullying, violent language that our current president does.

Betsy Heynen

Clinton

The State publishes a cross section of the letters we receive from South Carolinians in order to provide a forum for our community and also to allow our community to get a good look at itself, for good or bad. The letters represent the views of the letter writers, not necessarily of The State.

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