Letters to the Editor

Worker salaries are not what hurt businesses like GM

A break room at the United Automobile Workers Local 1112 office in Warren, Ohio, near the General Motors plant in Lordstown, Nov. 27, 2018. In a region where the president vowed that manufacturing jobs were coming back, the idling of a Chevrolet plant and its 1,600 workers is a major blow.
A break room at the United Automobile Workers Local 1112 office in Warren, Ohio, near the General Motors plant in Lordstown, Nov. 27, 2018. In a region where the president vowed that manufacturing jobs were coming back, the idling of a Chevrolet plant and its 1,600 workers is a major blow. The New York Times

I like General Motor’s motto that “what is good for GM is good for the country.” I personally also believe that what is good for me and mine is good for the country. The U.S. should invest in business and we, the people, so both will benefit from our great nation.

Now articles on GM indicate worker salaries hurt the viability of the company, not bad management decisions.

For worker salaries to be the problem, the country must stop subsiding GM’s 100 percent tax breaks on their paying workers salaries and benefits.

Then GM can blame their poor business decisions on which cars to make, etc., on the fact that suddenly they assume total responsibility for workers salaries.

That did not happen. Business expenses like salaries are totally tax deductible and outlays during the year are tax deductible as business expenses.

In other words, we the people, through our federal taxes subsidize businesses who often blame their bad management decisions on the worker, and not the management’s poor business decisions.

I am sick and tired of businesses making poor management decisions and blaming their problems on worker salaries and benefits.

Workers deserve their fair share of the wealth they create.

Marie Vevik

Cayce

US needs to step up on climate change fight

On the biggest shopping day of the year, the top-of-the-fold headline was “US climate report warns of greater risk, terrible costs.”

This is the world we live in, with the terrible fires and the devastating storms and the awful floods and the certainty that it will only get worse.

For decades, we have struggled to even find our footing for this daunting fight, but we have many tools, and many hands, and all the “whys” in the world. I stumbled across an appropriate charge from Mohammed Ali; “Impossible is just a big word thrown around by small men who find it easier to live in the world they’ve been given than to explore the power they have to change it. Impossible is not a fact. It’s an opinion. Impossible is not a declaration. It’s a dare. Impossible is potential. Impossible is temporary. Impossible is nothing.”

The U.S. needs to step off the sidelines.

Leslie Coolidge

Columbia

President should show thanks to military, not himself

The Midlands hosts and fully supports our great and selfless military, i.e. Fort Jackson/McEntire Air Base/Shaw AFB, so it’s with great sadness that I witness our president politicizing the military during this holiday season.

When the president was asked what he was thankful for this year, his response was incredibly himself. Himself!!! Man up and actually travel to a war zone, travel across the street and place a wreath at Arlington Cemetery, call some armed services leaders and congratulate them without telling them what a great job you’re doing for them. Challenge the word of any dictator or autocrat on this planet and occasionally accept the conclusions reached by our great investigative institutions. Man up and listen to the tape of a journalist that died at the hands of Jared’s BFF, another autocrat. In trying to sanction Iran and somehow persuade them to overthrow their own Ayatollah-dominated government while propping Saudi Arabia up as a gleaming example of what they should strive to be is disingenuous?

Lest I forget, it’s not about America; it’s about him. Thankful for himself ...

Mark Woods

Columbia

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