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  • Loose regulations attract megafarms to South Carolina

    In the past four years, out-of-state agribusinesses have purchased nearly 10,000 acres in the Edisto River basin, chopped down forests and established mega vegetable farms that today are sparking concerns about South Carolina’s ability to handle the expansion of industrial-scale agriculture. The big crop growing operations sucked up more than 2 billion gallons of water last year, an amount greater than some local utilities used to supply drinking water.

In the past four years, out-of-state agribusinesses have purchased nearly 10,000 acres in the Edisto River basin, chopped down forests and established mega vegetable farms that today are sparking concerns about South Carolina’s ability to handle the expansion of industrial-scale agriculture. The big crop growing operations sucked up more than 2 billion gallons of water last year, an amount greater than some local utilities used to supply drinking water. Tim Dominick, Matt Walsh and Sammy Fretwell mwalsh@thestate.com
In the past four years, out-of-state agribusinesses have purchased nearly 10,000 acres in the Edisto River basin, chopped down forests and established mega vegetable farms that today are sparking concerns about South Carolina’s ability to handle the expansion of industrial-scale agriculture. The big crop growing operations sucked up more than 2 billion gallons of water last year, an amount greater than some local utilities used to supply drinking water. Tim Dominick, Matt Walsh and Sammy Fretwell mwalsh@thestate.com

Mega-farms bring odors, cleared forests, huge water demands to rural SC

April 22, 2017 07:08 PM

UPDATED April 25, 2017 07:49 AM

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