Bubbling up from a pipe in the Lower Saluda River at Saluda Shoals Park is treated sewage water. Brazilian Eleoda thrives in the nitrogen rich water. South Carolina's effort to enforce environmental laws hasn't stopped companies and government agencies from repeatedly breaking rules to protect the air, land and water during the past two decades. About 25 percent of the 4,600 businesses and governments cited for violating environmental laws since 1991 have done so multiple times, and in some cases, their failures to follow the rules are continuing today, according to civil enforcement records analyzed by The State newspaper.
Bubbling up from a pipe in the Lower Saluda River at Saluda Shoals Park is treated sewage water. Brazilian Eleoda thrives in the nitrogen rich water. South Carolina's effort to enforce environmental laws hasn't stopped companies and government agencies from repeatedly breaking rules to protect the air, land and water during the past two decades. About 25 percent of the 4,600 businesses and governments cited for violating environmental laws since 1991 have done so multiple times, and in some cases, their failures to follow the rules are continuing today, according to civil enforcement records analyzed by The State newspaper. Kim Kim Foster-Tobin kkfoster@thestate.com
Bubbling up from a pipe in the Lower Saluda River at Saluda Shoals Park is treated sewage water. Brazilian Eleoda thrives in the nitrogen rich water. South Carolina's effort to enforce environmental laws hasn't stopped companies and government agencies from repeatedly breaking rules to protect the air, land and water during the past two decades. About 25 percent of the 4,600 businesses and governments cited for violating environmental laws since 1991 have done so multiple times, and in some cases, their failures to follow the rules are continuing today, according to civil enforcement records analyzed by The State newspaper. Kim Kim Foster-Tobin kkfoster@thestate.com

ARCHIVE: License to pollute? Company leads S.C. in repeat offenses

August 28, 2015 05:25 PM

UPDATED August 28, 2015 08:48 PM

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